AP-Biology-Chapter-18-Bacteria-Bacterial-Genetics-2008

AP-Biology-Chapter-18-Bacteria-Bacterial-Genetics-2008 -...

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2005-2006 AP Biology Chapter 18. Bacterial Genetics
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2005-2006 AP Biology Why study bacterial genetics? Its an easy place to start history we know more about it systems better understood simpler genome good model for control of genes build concepts from there to eukaryotes bacterial genetic systems are exploited in biotechnology
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2005-2006 AP Biology Bacteria Bacteria review one-celled organisms prokaryotes reproduce by mitosis binary fission rapid growth generation every ~20 minutes 10 8 (100 million) colony overnight! dominant form of life on Earth incredibly diverse
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2005-2006 AP Biology Bacterial diversity rods and spheres and spirals… Oh My!
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2005-2006 AP Biology Bacterial diversity Borrelia burgdorferi Lyme disease Treponema pallidum Syphillis Escherichia coli O157:H7 Hemorrhagic E. coli Enterococcus faecium skin infections
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2005-2006 AP Biology Bacterial genome Single circular chromosome haploid naked DNA no histone proteins ~4 million base pairs ~4300 genes 1/1000 DNA in eukaryote Intro to Bacteria video
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2005-2006 AP Biology No nucleus! No nuclear membrane chromosome in cytoplasm transcription & translation are coupled together no processing of mRNA no introns but Central Dogma still applies use same genetic code
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2005-2006 AP Biology Binary fission Replication of bacterial chromosome Asexual reproduction offspring genetically identical to parent where does variation come from?
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2005-2006 AP Biology Variation in bacteria Sources of variation spontaneous mutation transformation plasmids DNA fragments transduction conjugation transposons bacteria shedding DNA
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2005-2006 AP Biology Spontaneous mutation Spontaneous mutation is a significant source of variation in rapidly reproducing species Example : E. coli human colon (large intestines) 2 x 10 10 (billion) new E. coli each day!
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This note was uploaded on 10/18/2010 for the course BIO 204 taught by Professor O'neal during the Fall '07 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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AP-Biology-Chapter-18-Bacteria-Bacterial-Genetics-2008 -...

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