PET - http:/www.radiologyinfo.org February 14, 2008...

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February 14, 2008 Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scanning…1 http://www.radiologyinfo.org February 14, 2008 Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scanning This procedure is reviewed by a physician with expertise in the area presented and is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic areas. What is Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scanning? Positron emission tomography, also called PET imaging or a PET scan, is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. Nuclear medicine is a subspecialty within the field of radiology that uses very small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose or treat disease and other abnormalities within the body. Nuclear medicine imaging procedures are noninvasive and usually painless medical tests that help physicians diagnose medical conditions. These imaging scans use radioactive materials called a radiopharmaceutical or radiotracer. Depending on the type of nuclear medicine exam you are undergoing, the radiotracer is injected into a vein, swallowed by mouth or inhaled as a gas and eventually collects in the area of your body being examined, where it gives off energy in the form of gamma rays. This energy is detected by a device called a gamma camera, a (positron emission tomography) PET scanner and/or probe. These devices work together with a computer to measure the amount of radiotracer absorbed by your body and to produce special pictures offering details on both the structure and function of organs and other internal body parts. In some centers, nuclear medicine images can be superimposed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to produce special views, a practice known as image fusion or co- registration. These views allow the information from two different studies to be correlated and interpreted on one image, leading to more precise information and accurate diagnoses. A PET scan measures important body functions, such as blood flow, oxygen use, and sugar (glucose) metabolism, to help doctors evaluate how well organs and tissues are functioning. What are some common uses of the procedure? PET scans are performed to: detect cancer determine the how much a cancer has spread in the body assess the effectiveness of a treatment plan, such as cancer therapy determine if a cancer has returned after treatment determine blood flow to the heart muscle determine the effects of a heart attack, or myocardial infarction, on areas of the heart identify areas of the heart muscle that would benefit from a procedure such as angioplasty or coronary artery bypass surgery (in combination with a myocardial perfusion scan). evaluate brain abnormalities, such as tumors,
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This note was uploaded on 10/15/2010 for the course BIM BIM281 taught by Professor Volkmar during the Spring '08 term at UC Davis.

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PET - http:/www.radiologyinfo.org February 14, 2008...

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