objective1 - 1 The Human Body An Orientation Objectives An...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1: The Human Body: An Orientation Objectives An Overview of Anatomy and Physiology 1. Define anatomy and physiology and describe their subdivisions. 2. Explain the principle of complementarity. Levels of Structural Organization 3. Name the different levels of structural organization that make up the human body, and explain their relationships. 4. List the 11 organ systems of the body, identify their components, and briefly explain the major function(s) of each system. Maintaining Life 5. List the functional characteristics necessary to maintain life in humans. 6. List the survival needs of the body. Homeostasis 7. Define homeostasis and explain its importance. 8. Describe how negative and positive feedback maintain body homeostasis. 9. Describe the relationship between homeostatic imbalance and disease. The Language of Anatomy 10. Describe the anatomical position. 11. Use correct anatomical terminology to describe body directions, body regions, and body planes or sections. 12. Locate and name the major body cavities and their subdivisions and associated membranes, and list the major organs contained within them. 13. Name the four quadrants or nine regions of the abdominopelvic cavity and list the organs they contain. Suggested Lecture Outline I. An Overview of Anatomy and Physiology (pp. 2–3)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A. Anatomy is the study of the structure of body parts and their relationships to each other, and physiology is the study of the function of body parts (p. 2). B. Topics of Anatomy (p. 2) 1. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy is the study of structures large enough to be seen with the naked eye. a. Regional anatomy is the study of all body structures in a given body region. b. Systemic anatomy is the study of all structures in a body system. c. Surface anatomy is the study of internal body structures as they relate to the overlying skin. 2. Microscopic anatomy is the study of structures that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. a. Cytology is the study of individual cells. b. Histology is the study of tissues. 3. Developmental anatomy is the study of the change in body structures over the course of a lifetime; embryology focuses on development that occurs before birth. 4. Specialized Branches of Anatomy a. Pathological anatomy is the study of structural changes associated with disease. b. Radiographic anatomy is the study of internal structures using specialized visualization techniques. c. Molecular biology is the study of biological molecules. 5. Essential tools for studying anatomy are the mastery of medical terminology and the development of keen observational skills. C. Topics of Physiology (pp. 2–3) 1. Physiology has several topics, most of which consider the function of specific organ systems. 2.
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 12

objective1 - 1 The Human Body An Orientation Objectives An...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online