RoutingProtocols - Routing Protocols Dynamic Routing...

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Routing Protocols
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2 Dynamic Routing Protocols Why Dynamic Routing Protocols ? Each router acts independently, based on information in its router forwarding table Dynamic routing protocols allow routers to share information in their router forwarding tables Router Forwarding Table Data
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3 Routing Information Protocol (RIP) Routing Information protocol (RIP) is the simplest dynamic routing protocol Each router broadcasts its entire routing table frequently Broadcasting makes RIP unsuitable for large networks Routing Table
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4 Routing Information Protocol (RIP) RIP is the simplest dynamic routing protocol Broadcasts go to hosts as well as to routers RIP interrupts hosts frequently, slowing them down; Unsuitable for large networks Routing Table
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5 Routing Information Protocol (RIP) RIP is Limited RIP routing table has a field to indicate the number of router hops to a distant host The RIP maximum is 15 hops Farther networks are ignored Unsuitable for very large networks Hop Hop
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6 Routing Information Protocol Is a Distance Vector Protocol “New York” starts, announces itself with a RIP broadcast “Chicago” learns that New York is one hop away Passes this on in its broadcasts New York Chicago Dallas 1 hop NY is 1
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7 Routing Information Protocol Learning Routing Information “Dallas” receives broadcast from Chicago Already knows “Chicago” is one hop from Dallas So New York must be two hops from Dallas Places this information in its routing table New York Chicago Dallas 1 hop 1 hop NY is 1 NY is 2
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8 Routing Information Protocol Slow Convergence Convergence is getting correct routing tables after a failure in a router or link RIP converges very slowly May take minutes During that time, many packets may be lost
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9 Routing Information Protocol Encapsulation Carried in data field of UDP datagram Port number is 520 UDP is unreliable, so RIP messages do not always get through A single lost RIP message does little or no harm UDP Header UDP Data Field RIP Message
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OSPF Routing Protocol Link State Protocol Link is connection between two routers OSPF routing table stores more information about each link than just its hop count: cost, reliability, etc. Allows OSPF routers to optimize routing based on
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This note was uploaded on 10/15/2010 for the course CSIS 470 taught by Professor Dr.jamesharris during the Spring '10 term at Pittsburg State Uiversity.

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RoutingProtocols - Routing Protocols Dynamic Routing...

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