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lecture_1 - MA 35100 LECTURE NOTES: MONDAY, JANUARY 11...

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Unformatted text preview: MA 35100 LECTURE NOTES: MONDAY, JANUARY 11 Course Information • Instructor: Edray Goins. Office: MATH 612. Extension: 4-1936. E-Mail: [email protected] . Office hours will be Thursdays from 10:00 AM through 12:00 PM, then again from 3:30 PM through 5:00 PM. • Meeting Times: Division 2 will meet Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 9:30 AM through 10:20 AM in REC 113. Division 5 will meet Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 3:30 PM through 4:30 PM in REC 225. • Textbook: We will use Otto Bretscher’s Linear Algebra with Applications (Fourth Edition) as published by Pearson (2009). However, all lecture notes and other course material will be available on Blackboard as well as at the web site http://homepage.mac.com/ehgoins/ma351/index.html • Homework: There will be ten (10) problems a week, due on Friday afternoons at the start of lecture. Late homework will not be accepted. The first assignment will be due Friday, January 22. • Grading Policy: There will be weekly homework worth 40% of the grade, two midterm exams worth 20% each, and a final exam worth 20%. Linear Equations The word “algebra” comes from the Arabic word al-jabr which means “restoration of broken parts.” There are several kinds of algebra: • linear algebra, the art of solving systems of linear equations • abstract algebra, where one generalizes the art of solving equations to the manipulation of abstract symbols • commutative algebra, where one focuses on the structure of algebra itself We begin with a rather simple problem to illustrate the main techniques we will explore in this course. Some 2,000 years ago, a Chinese text considered the problem of determining the volume of bundles of rice from a harvest. The question involved three qualities of rice – inferior, medium grade, and superior – where the total yield of a harvest is known and the individual volume of the...
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This note was uploaded on 10/18/2010 for the course MATH 351 taught by Professor Egoins during the Spring '10 term at Purdue.

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lecture_1 - MA 35100 LECTURE NOTES: MONDAY, JANUARY 11...

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