electrical - ELECTRICAL OSHA OFFICE OF TRAINING AND...

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E LECTRICAL OSHA OFFICE OF TRAINING AND EDUCATION
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These materials were developed by OSHA’s Office of Training and Education and are intended to assist employers, workers, and others as they strive to improve workplace health and safety. While we attempt to thoroughly address specific topics, it is not possible to include discussion of everything necessary to ensure a healthy and safe working environment in a presentation of this nature. Thus, this information must be understood as a tool for addressing workplace hazards, rather than an exhaustive statement of an employer’s legal obligations, which are defined by statute, regulations, and standards. Likewise, to the extent that this information references practices or procedures that may enhance health or safety, but which are not required by a statute, regulation, or standard, it cannot, and does not, create additional legal obligations. Finally, over time, OSHA may modify rules and interpretations in light of new technology, information, or circumstances; to keep apprised of such developments, or to review information on a wide range of occupational safety and health topics, you can visit OSHA’s website at www.osha.gov .
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ELECTRICAL Examination, Installation, and Use of Equipment Identification of Disconnecting Means and Circuits Working Space About Electrical Equipment Guarding of Live Parts Identification of Conductors Polarity of Connections Grounding Grounding Path Grounding of Equipment Connected by Cord and Plug Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI’s) Cabinets, Boxes, and Fittings Flexible Cords and Cables Reference : OSHA General Industry Standards, Subpart S, Electrical Additional Source of Information : NFPA 70, National Electrical Code
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1 ELECTRICAL INTRODUCTION Electricity has become an essential of modern life, both at home and on the job. Some employees work with electricity directly, as is the case with engineers, electricians, or people who do wiring, such as overhead lines, cable harnesses, or circuit assemblies. Others, such as office workers and salespeople, work with it indirectly. As a source of power, electricity is accepted without much thought to the hazards encountered. Perhaps because it has become such a familiar part of our surroundings, it often is not treated with the respect it deserves. OSHA's electrical standards address the government's concern that electricity has long been recognized as a serious workplace hazard, exposing employees to such dangers as electric shock, electrocution, fires and explosions. The objective of the standards is to minimize such potential hazards by specifying design characteristics of safety in use of electrical equipment and systems. OSHA's electrical standards were carefully developed to cover only those parts of
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This note was uploaded on 10/19/2010 for the course EE 147 taught by Professor Eric during the Spring '10 term at ITT Tech Flint.

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electrical - ELECTRICAL OSHA OFFICE OF TRAINING AND...

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