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studentmanual - STUDENTS MANUAL TO ACCOMPANY OPERATING...

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STUDENT’S MANUAL TO ACCOMPANY OPERATING SYSTEM CONCEPTS SEVENTH EDITION ABRAHAM SILBERSCHATZ Yale University PETER BAER GALVIN Corporate Technologies GREG GAGNE Westminster College
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Preface This volume is a student’s manual for the Seventh Edition of Operating System Concepts , by Abraham Silberschatz, Peter Baer Galvin, and Greg Gagne. It consists of answers to the exercises in the parent text. Although we have tried to produce a student’s manual that will aid all of the users of our book as much as possible, there can always be improvements (improved answers, additional questions, sample test questions, programming projects, alternative orders of presentation of the material, additional refer- ences, and so on). We invite you, both instructors and students, to help us improve this manual. If you have better solutions to the exercises or other items that would be of use with Operating System Concepts ,weinv i teyouto send them to us for consideration in later editions of this manual. All contri- butions will, of course, be properly credited to their contributor. Internet electronic mail should be addressed to os-book@cs.yale.edu. Physical mail may be sent to Avi Silberschatz, Yale University, Department of Computer Science, 51 Prospect Street, P.O. box 208285, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. A. S. P. B. G G. G. iii
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Contents Chapter 1 Introduction ................................................. 1 Chapter 2 Operating-System Structures ................................ 5 Chapter 3 Processes .................................................... 9 Chapter 4 Threads ..................................................... 11 Chapter 5 CPU Scheduling ............................................ 13 Chapter 6 Process Synchronization .................................... 17 Chapter 7 Deadlocks .................................................. 21 Chapter 8 Memory Management ...................................... 25 Chapter 9 Virtual Memory 29 Chapter 10 File-Systems Interface 35 Chapter 11 File-Systems Implementation .............................. 39 Chapter 12 Mass Storage Structure ..................................... 43 Chapter 13 I/O Systems ................................................ 51 Chapter 14 Protection 55 Chapter 15 Security 57 Chapter 16 Distributed System Structures ............................. 59 Chapter 17 Distributed File Systems ................................... 63 Chapter 18 Distributed Coordination .................................. 65 Chapter 19 Real-Time Systems ......................................... 67 Chapter 20 Multimedia Systems ....................................... 69 Chapter 21 The Linux System .......................................... 71 Chapter 22 Windows XP ............................................... 79 Chapter 23 In±uential Operating Systems 83 v
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1 CHAPTER Introduction Exercises 1.1 What are the three main purposes of an operating system? Answer: • To provide an environment for a computer user to execute programs on computer hardware in a convenient and efFcient manner. • To allocate the separate resources of the computer as needed to solve the problem given. The allocation process should be as fair and efFcient as possible. • As a control program it serves two major functions: (1) supervision of the execution of user programs to prevent errors and improper use of the computer, and (2) management of the operation and control of I/O devices. 1.2 What are the main differences between operating systems for mainframe computers and personal computers? Answer: Generally, operating systems for batch systems have simpler requirements than for personal computers. Batch systems do not have to be concerned with interacting with a user as much as a personal computer. As a result, an operating system for a PC must be concerned with response time for an interactive user. Batch systems do not have
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studentmanual - STUDENTS MANUAL TO ACCOMPANY OPERATING...

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