PHY7A review - Physics 7A The life and times of atoms...

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Physics 7A The life and times of atoms, molecules and the energies associated with them (Fall 2006)
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Approach to problems Try and fit the problem into a particular category. Some problems require thinking of more than one concept. I am going to try and review the course, but to prepare for the exam I will be taking concepts from other parts of the course and mixing them. This is going to be a lecture; I suggest going to review sessions to ask questions. Best way to learn physics is by doing! http://student.physics.ucdavis.edu/~dmartin /
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Other review sessions There are many other review sessions this week. Don’t expect the TAs to plug in the numbers for you - that is not what the review sessions are for. It is completely appropriate to ask them what physics and assumptions go into a question. It is completely appropriate to ask the TA to write down a complete answer (i.e. what would you be expected to write down on the final). This does not include the final step of putting numbers in, however
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Three-phase model Heat added Temperature (solid) (liquid) (gas) Putting heat in will change the temperature in a particular phase. Putting heat in at a phase change will convert from one phase to another, but will not change temperature. (mixed phase) (mixed phase) Question: Which phase has the smallest heat capacity? How can you tell? Which phase transition requires more energy, and why? Boiling/sublimation temperature Melting/Freezing temperature
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Three phase model Concepts defined: Phases: solid, liquid and gas E thermal Heat capacity C = Q/T Specific heat (per kg and per mole) E bond Heat of melting, heat of vaporisation Phase change occur at constant temperature
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Three-phase model Heat added Temperature (solid) (liquid) (gas) Boiling/sublimation temperature Melting/Freezing temperature Answering these questions should start by going off the graph. Explaining the results should use the particle model of matter (modes & bonds). | Δ H vap Δ m | | Δ H melt Δ m |
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Three-phase model Heat added Temperature (solid) (liquid) (gas) Boiling/sublimation temperature Melting/Freezing temperature Answering these questions should start by going off the graph. Explaining the results should use the particle model of matter (modes & bonds). | Δ H vap Δ m | | Δ H melt Δ m | Question: What would a three-phase model diagram look like if vibrational mode(s) where becoming activated?
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Three-phase model Heat added Temperature Boiling/sublimation temperature Melting/Freezing temperature (low heat capacity) (high heat capacity) Note: This is a rather unconventional question for the three-phase model. Normally the discussion of modes is in the particle model. # modes in solid & liquid are generally constant, so we expect lines.
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Three-phase model: Summary Break processes up along straight line segments.
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