applied cryptography - protocols, algorithms, and source code in c

57 sec 127 sec table 203 comparison of rsa and dsa

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Unformatted text preview: e DSS. In 1982, the government had solicited public-key algorithms for a standard [537]. After that, there wasn’t a peep out of NIST for nine years. Companies such as IBM, Apple, Novell, Lotus, Northern Telecom, Microsoft, DEC, and Sun had already spent large amounts of money implementing the RSA algorithm. They were not interested in losing their investment. In all, NIST received 109 comments by the end of the first comment period on February 28, 1992. Previous Table of Contents Next Products | Contact Us | About Us | Privacy | Ad Info | Home Use of this site is subject to certain Terms & Conditions, Copyright © 1996-2000 EarthWeb Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction whole or in part in any form or medium without express written permission of EarthWeb is prohibited. Read EarthWeb's privacy statement. To access the contents, click the chapter and section titles. Applied Cryptography, Second Edition: Protocols, Algorthms, and Source Code in C (cloth) Go! Keyword Brief Full Advanced Search Search Tips (Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.) Author(s): Bruce Schneier ISBN: 0471128457 Publication Date: 01/01/96 Search this book: Go! Previous Table of Contents Next ----------- Let’s look at the criticisms against DSA, one by one. 1. DSA cannot be used for encryption or key distribution. True, but not the point of the standard. This is a signature standard. NIST should have a standard for public-key encryption. NIST is committing a grave injustice to the American people by not implementing a public-key encryption standard. It is suspicious that this proposed digital signature standard cannot be used for encryption. (As it turns out, though, it can—see Section 23.3.) That does not mean that a signature standard is useless. 2. DSA was developed by the NSA, and there may be a trapdoor in the algorithm. Much of the initial comments were just paranoia: “NIST’s denial of information with no apparent justification does not inspire confidence in DSS, but intensifies con...
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This note was uploaded on 10/18/2010 for the course MATH CS 301 taught by Professor Aliulger during the Fall '10 term at Koç University.

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