{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

applied cryptography - protocols, algorithms, and source code in c

All other cryptosystems are breakable in a ciphertext

Info icon This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: phertext. 4. Information deduction. A cryptanalyst gains some information about the key or plaintext. This information could be a few bits of the key, some information about the form of the plaintext, and so forth. An algorithm is unconditionally secure if, no matter how much ciphertext a cryptanalyst has, there is not enough information to recover the plaintext. In point of fact, only a one-time pad (see Section 1.5) is unbreakable given infinite resources. All other cryptosystems are breakable in a ciphertext-only attack, simply by trying every possible key one by one and checking whether the resulting plaintext is meaningful. This is called a brute-force attack (see Section 7.1). Cryptography is more concerned with cryptosystems that are computationally infeasible to break. An algorithm is considered computationally secure (sometimes called strong) if it cannot be broken with available resources, either current or future. Exactly what constitutes “available resources” is open to interpretation. You can measure the complexity (see Section 11.1) of an attack in different ways: 1. Data complexity. The amount of data needed as input to the attack. 2. Processing complexity. The time needed to perform the attack. This is often called the work factor. 3. Storage requirements. The amount of memory needed to do the attack. As a rule of thumb, the complexity of an attack is taken to be the minimum of these three factors. Some attacks involve trading off the three complexities: A faster attack might be possible at the expense of a greater storage requirement. Complexities are expressed as orders of magnitude. If an algorithm has a processing complexity of 2128, then 2128 operations are required to break the algorithm. (These operations may be complex and time-consuming.) Still, if you assume that you have enough computing speed to perform a million operations every second and you set a million parallel processors against the task, it will still take over 1019 years to recover the key....
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern