applied cryptography - protocols, algorithms, and source code in c

During the thirties and forties a few basic papers

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: entirely in secret, began to make fundamental advances in cryptography. During the thirties and forties a few basic papers did appear in the open literature and several treatises on the subject were published, but the latter were farther and farther behind the state of the art. By the end of the war the transition was complete. With one notable exception, the public literature had died. That exception was Claude Shannon’s paper “The Communication Theory of Secrecy Systems,” which appeared in the Bell System Technical Journal in 1949 [1432]. It was similar to Friedman’s 1918 paper, in that it grew out of wartime work of Shannon’s. After the Second World War ended it was declassified, possibly by mistake. From 1949 until 1967 the cryptographic literature was barren. In that year a different sort of contribution appeared: David Kahn’s history, The Codebreakers [794]. It didn’t contain any new technical ideas, but it did contain a remarkably complete history of what had gone before, including mention of some things that the government still considered secret. The significance of The Codebreakers lay not just in its remarkable scope, but also in the fact that it enjoyed good sales and made tens of thousands of people, who had never given the matter a moment’s thought, aware of cryptography. A trickle of new cryptographic papers began to be written. At about the same time, Horst Feistel, who had earlier worked on identification friend or foe devices for the Air Force, took his lifelong passion for cryptography to the IBM Watson Laboratory in Yorktown Heights, New York. There, he began development of what was to become the U.S. Data Encryption Standard; by the early 1970s several technical reports on this subject by Feistel and his colleagues had been made public by IBM [1482,1484,552]. This was the situation when I entered the field in late 1972. The cryptographic literature wasn’t abundant, but what there was included some very shiny nuggets. Cryptology presents a difficulty not found in no...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 10/18/2010 for the course MATH CS 301 taught by Professor Aliulger during the Fall '10 term at Koç University.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online