applied cryptography - protocols, algorithms, and source code in c

In this protocol carol is a well known terrorist

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Unformatted text preview: s can be found in Section 23.11. This idea is quite powerful. It allows a person to prove his identity without any physical token. However, it’s not perfect. Here are some abuses. Previous Table of Contents Next Products | Contact Us | About Us | Privacy | Ad Info | Home Use of this site is subject to certain Terms & Conditions, Copyright © 1996-2000 EarthWeb Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction whole or in part in any form or medium without express written permission of EarthWeb is prohibited. Read EarthWeb's privacy statement. To access the contents, click the chapter and section titles. Applied Cryptography, Second Edition: Protocols, Algorthms, and Source Code in C (cloth) Go! Keyword Brief Full Advanced Search Search Tips (Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.) Author(s): Bruce Schneier ISBN: 0471128457 Publication Date: 01/01/96 Search this book: Go! Previous Table of Contents Next ----------- The Chess Grandmaster Problem Here’s how Alice, who doesn’t even know the rules to chess, can defeat a grandmaster. (This is sometimes called the Chess Grandmaster Problem.) She challenges both Gary Kasparov and Anatoly Karpov to a game, at the same time and place, but in separate rooms. She plays white against Kasparov and black against Karpov. Neither grandmaster knows about the other. Karpov, as white, makes his first move. Alice records the move and walks into the room with Kasparov. Playing white, she makes the same move against Kasparov. Kasparov makes his first move as black. Alice records the move, walks into the room with Karpov, and makes the same move. This continues, until she wins one game and loses the other, or both games end in a draw. In reality, Kasparov is playing Karpov and Alice is simply acting as the middleman, mimicking the moves of each grandmaster on the other’s board. However, if neither Karpov nor Kasparov knows about the other’s presence, each will be impressed with Alice’s play. This kind of fraud can be used against zero-knowledge proofs of identity [485,120]. While Alice is p...
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