CH6 - Centripetal Force The force causing the centripetal...

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Centripetal Force The force causing the centripetal acceleration is sometimes called the centripetal force This is not a new force, it is a new role for a force It is a force acting in the role of a force that causes a circular motion
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Centripetal Acceleration An inward net force is required to make a turn in a circle. This inward net force requirement is known as a centripetal force requirement. In the absence of any net force, an object in motion (such as the passenger) continues in motion in a straight line at constant speed. This is Newton's first law of motion.
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Application of Newtons laws of motion to circular motion problems
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Horizontal (Flat) Curve The force of static friction supplies the centripetal force The maximum speed at which the car can negotiate the curve is Note, this does not depend on the mass of the car v gr
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Banked Curve These are designed with friction equaling zero There is a component of the normal force that supplies the centripetal force 2 tan v rg
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Banked Curve
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Banked Curve
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Banked Curve
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Banked Curve
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Banked Curve
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Banked Curve
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Banked Curve
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Test 1 Monday February 15 Covers chapters 2-5 Formula sheet available online for printing (if you need it). Mainly kinematic equations of motion, newton’s second law and centripetal acceleration formulas needed One section B problem from OS and assigments each Practice exam available online
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More Examples
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More Examples
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More Examples
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More Examples
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More Examples A car traveling on a straight road at 9.00 m/s goes over a hump in the road. The hump may be regarded as an arc of a circle of radius 11.0 m. (a) What is the apparent weight of a 600-N woman in the car as she rides over the hump? (b) What must be the speed of the car over the hump if she is to experience weightlessness? (That is, if her apparent weight is zero.) Answer: (a) 149 N; (b) 10.4 m/s
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Conical Pendulum The object is in equilibrium in the vertical direction and undergoes uniform circular motion in the horizontal direction v is independent of m sin tan v Lg
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Motion in a Horizontal Circle The speed at which the object moves depends on the mass of the object and the tension in the cord The centripetal force is supplied by the tension Tr v m
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Conical Pendulum
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Conical Pendulum
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Conical Pendulum
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Conical Pendulum
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Conical Pendulum
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Loop-the-Loop This is an example of a vertical circle At the bottom of the loop (b), the upward force experienced by the object is greater than its weight 2 1 bot v n mg rg
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Loop-the-Loop, At the top of the circle (c), the force exerted on the object is less than its weight 2 1 top v n mg rg
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CH6 - Centripetal Force The force causing the centripetal...

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