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Lecture 1 module

Lecture 1 module - Welcome to CS 136 Instructors Byron...

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Welcome to CS 136 Instructors: Byron Weber Becker, Kate Larson, Jiye Li, Prabhakar Ragde Tutors: Sanderz Fung, Kyung-Min Kim, Kyle Spaans (plus part-timers) Web page (main information source): http://www.student.cs.uwaterloo.ca/˜cs136 Newsgroup : uw.cs.cs136 Lectures: TuTh 8:30, 1:00 (MC 2054), 10:00, 11:30, 2:30 (MC 2017) Tutorials: Wed or Fri, starting January 14 CS 136 Winter 2009 01: Introduction to CS 136 1
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Some logistics Textbooks: How to Design Programs (HtDP) by Felleisen, Flatt, Findler, Krishnamurthi. C Programming: A Modern Approach (CP) by K. N. King. Presentation handouts: will be available on Web page. Marking Scheme: 5% participation, 20% assignments (7-9 in total), 30% midterm (one), 45% final. Software: DrScheme v4.1.3 GNU C compiler ( gcc ), text editor (e.g. vim ) CS 136 Winter 2009 01: Introduction to CS 136 2
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Class participation mark Based on use of “clickers” Register on course Web page Purpose: to encourage active learning and provide real-time feedback Multiple-choice questions asked during lecture One mark for voting, one additional mark for right answer Votes from all lecture sections pooled Best 75% over whole term used for 5% of final grade CS 136 Winter 2009 01: Introduction to CS 136 3
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Course overview continues with functional paradigm (using Scheme) introduces imperative paradigm (using C) preparation for subsequent CS courses (major and minor) more focus on “real-world” issues dealing efficiently with large amounts of data organizing larger programs reusing and sharing code CS 136 Winter 2009 01: Introduction to CS 136 4
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Why C? basic imperative syntax shared with many other languages modest number of new language constructs and concepts can be explained with a reasonably clear semantic model visibility of machine level contrasts with the abstractions of Scheme CS 136 Winter 2009 01: Introduction to CS 136 5
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Why not C++? C++ has several different layers: An imperative core (almost identical to C); An object/class system for organizing larger programs; Templates allowing the design of parameterized classes for use in libraries. The last two are not central to CS 136 (we will touch on the ideas). You can think of C as a “Beginning Student” level of C++. C++ will be examined further in CS 241 and CS 246. CS 136 Winter 2009 01: Introduction to CS 136 6
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Why not Java? originally designed to appeal to experienced C++ programmers requires premature introduction of advanced concepts Java’s benefits are better appreciated after learning C learning Java (or C++) is straightforward after CS 136 CS 136 Winter 2009 01: Introduction to CS 136 7
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Overview: Interaction so far: in DrScheme’s read-evaluate-print loop (REPL) . much computation involves more frequent interaction (keyboard, mouse, file system, network) interactive programs can be run inside or outside DrScheme C requires explicit input and output , or I/O CS 136 Winter 2009 01: Introduction to CS 136 8
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Overview: Architecture substitution model provides a simple explanation of programs How does DrScheme really run a program?
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