Race and My Community - Race and My Community Samantha...

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Race and My Community Samantha Karsner ETH/125 09/05/10 June Rizzo
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Throughout my life, I have lived in many areas and have experienced different community viewpoints about accepting race and ethnicity. From each of those places, I have seen commonalities and differences on how different people are treated. Some places I have lived, I have been the minority, and some I have been a majority. I currently live in a community best described as a melting pot. Although the El Paso Metropolis has a highly diversified melting pot population, racism, media and the government still contribute to the discrimination of many of the El Paso residents, which has caused uncertainty and grave disadvantages. Demographics My current community is a highly diversified area with an assorted array of race and ethnic groups. Although my community is compiled of this kind of diversity, like most of America, the White race is still at a majority. The current demographics for the El Paso area depicts that 56.2 percent of the population are White, 23 percent are Hispanic, 15.3 percent are Black, and 4.6 percent are Asian/Pacific Islander, (Diveritydata.org, 2007). This alone shows that although Dallas is exceptionally diversified, the population balance continues to be out-weighed by the White race. Although I am part of the majority at this time, the face of El Paso is going through a change to become more evenly distributed. Between 1990 and 2000, El Paso has seen a dramatic increase in certain minority groups. The greatest increase is the Asian/Pacific Islander, which has increased by over 138 percent. This is followed by the Hispanic group with a change of 116.6 percent, Blacks with 29.9 percent, and finally the Whites with only a 9.4 percent increase, (Diveritydata.org, 2007). Hopefully, with this rate of increase of population from each of the major minority groups in this area, El Paso will flourish as an even and balanced community. Although that dream would be ideal, it is currently not the reality. Many of the residents and government officials of the El Paso Metropolis fight very hard for either the
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gain of equality for all, or the opposing viewpoint that the continuation of discrimination and segregation is the right path for our community. The True Colors of Politics The El Paso Metropolis is located within one of the largest border states and therefore, one can imagine the constant political push and pull regarding minority groups and how situations are handled. I cannot turn on the television without some sort of media reporting on a new law being sent to Congress regarding the future of immigration and what is seen as the American way. Many states have brought into debate the idea that English should be the one and
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This note was uploaded on 10/21/2010 for the course ETH 125 ETH/125 taught by Professor N.a. during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Race and My Community - Race and My Community Samantha...

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