Final Project Womens Suffrage Movement

Final Project Womens Suffrage Movement - COM220 RESEARCH...

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COM220 RESEARCH WRITING Created Equal Final Research Paper Samantha Karsner 7/1/2010
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ors from the 1848 Seneca Falls convention ges.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dasisson/richard/images/8ba00.jpg ure Women marching for the right to vote. . http://www.albany.edu/~eb7540/women.jpg and women of the era opposed the Women's Suffrage. shistory.about.com/library/graphics/opposed_suffrage.jpg P a g e | 2 Jennifer Morrell
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Adam and Eve were made to be equals and it has been said that women were made in the reflection of men. Women have moved forward and are trying to stand next to the men of the world today. However, women have had the rights to equality hidden for them for the sake of society’s eyes. Simple, the equal rights for women, as in pay, and job promotions. Whereas there are laws put in position to ensure that the sex of a person does not matter, the suffrage for women continues today. For many people in the United States, they may be unaware of what this historical fight was all about. They may even be unaware what it has to do with women today. Women started fighting for the same rights as men all the way back in 1776 with Abigail Adams. Abigail Adams writes a letter to her husband in 1776 asking him to "remember the ladies" in the new code of laws. Adams replies the men will fight the "despotism of the petticoat" (Timeline of Women's Suffrage in the United States, 1995). This was best explained by “Jefferson when he expressed his disgust at this prospect by writing that women should never be allowed to “mix promiscuously in the public meetings of men” (Naler, 2008).This still today is evident in many cultures and the work front of America. Although the
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United States Constitution states: all men are created, this was not always been the case for women in the country, and even today, women are still fighting for equal treatment. In 1848, the first women’s rights convention was held in Seneca Falls, New York. There were two days of discussions and debates (Figure: 1). “Sixty-eight women and thirty-two men signed a Declaration of Sentiments, which outlines grievances and sets the agenda for the women’s rights movement. A set of twelve resolutions adopted calling for equal treatment of women and men under the law and voting rights for women” (Imbomoni, Women's Rights Movement in the United States, 2007).Many women were hoping that when they rallied together at the convention that the government would take notice about women being equal citizens to men. Following the convention 21 years later in “May 1869, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton formed the National Woman Suffrage Association to achieve voting rights for women by means of a Congressional amendment to the Constitution” (Imbomoni, Women's Rights Movement in the United States, 2007). Following those efforts in “November 1869, Lucy Stone, Henry Blackwell and Others formed the American Woman Suffrage Association with the purpose of gaining voting rights for women through
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This note was uploaded on 10/21/2010 for the course SCI 275 SCI 275 taught by Professor Lee during the Spring '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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Final Project Womens Suffrage Movement - COM220 RESEARCH...

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