Module 2 Study Guide

Module 2 Study Guide - Module 2 Study Guide Tips answer...

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Module 2 Study Guide Tips : answer every question. eliminate answers that you don’t recognize or that are obviously wrong; this increases your odds of guessing correctly if you don’t know the answer. READ the assigned readings . study your lecture notes and look over discussion exercises. Look over chapters 3 and 4 in the textbook. Terms and Concepts : Exponential v. Logistic population curves Timeline of human population Population increasing and increasing at increasing rate, up until the 1960s This called “exponential” (or J-Curve) growth World rate has now slowed as fertility rates have dropped New time path: “logistic” (or S-Curve) growth J-Curve: the ever-increasing base population has reached such a size that each additional doubling results in an astronomical increase in the total. A simple mental exercise suggests the inevitable consequences such as doubling, or J-curve growth S-Curve: The horizontal bending, or leveling of an exponential or J-curve. It represents a population size consistent with and supportable by the exploitable resource base. When the population is equivalent to the carrying capacity of the occupied area, it is said to have reached a homeostatic plateau. What are the important factors for predicting spatial interaction? Spatial Interaction: -Movement of (goods, people, or info) between places on earth’s surface - An indication of interdependence between different geographic locations or areas. Ullman’s “Basis of Spatial Interaction” : 1. Complementarity: For 2 places to interact, one place must have a supply of an item for which there is an effective demand at the other. Effective supply and demand are important considerations; mere differences from place to place in commodity surplus or deficit are not enough to initiate exchange. 2. Transferability: Interaction occurs only when acceptable costs of an exchange are met. Transferability is an expression of the mobility of a commodity and is a function of three interrelated conditions: (1) the characteristics and value of the product; (2) the distance, measured in time and money penalties, over which it must be moved; and (3) the ability of the commodity to bear the costs of the movement. Transferability is not a constant condition 3. Intervening opportunities: A more attractive source of supply or demand closer at hand or cheaper . Serves to reduce supply/demand interactions that otherwise might develop between distant complementary areas. Complemntarity can only be effected in the absence of more attractive sources of supply or demand closer and hand or cheaper Distance Decay: The declining intensity of any activity, process, or function with increasing distance from its point of origin Friction of Distance: A measure of the retarding or restricting effect of distance on spatial interaction. Generally, the greater the distance, the greater the “friction” and the less the interaction or exchange, or
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Module 2 Study Guide - Module 2 Study Guide Tips answer...

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