Chapter 10 Outline - Chemistry 101 Vandan Desai Chapter 10:...

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Chemistry 101 Vandan Desai P a g e | 1 Chapter 10: Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure (Lecture Outline) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I. Molecular shapes are built from five basic arrangements &umber of bonds (Bonding Domains) &umber of Lone Pairs (&onbonding Domains) &umber of Charge Clouds (Total Domains) Molecular Geometry Bond Angle Example 2 0 2 180° 3 0 3 120° 2 1 3 - 4 0 4 109.5° 3 1 4 - 2 2 4 - 5 0 5 Angle b/w two equatorial bond = 90° & angle b/w axial and equatorial bond = 120° 4 1 5 - 3 2 5 - 2 3 5 - 6 0 6 90°
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Chemistry 101 Vandan Desai P a g e | 2 5 1 6 - 4 2 6 - II. Molecular shapes are built from five basic arrangements A. Valence shell electron pair repulsion model (VSEPR model) —idea that groups of electrons repel each other and will position themselves as far away from each other as possible within a molecule B. Electron domain —region in space where electrons can be found i. Bonding domains: Contain electron pairs that are involved in bonds between two atoms All electrons in a bond occupy the same region in space and so they all belong to the same bond domain (including single , double , triple bond) ii. Nonbonding domains: Contain valence electrons that are associated with a single atom Either an unshared pair of valence electrons (lone pair ) or an unpaired electron (found in molecules with an odd number of valence electrons) iii. Based on the VSEPR model, electron domains keep as far away as possible from each other while at same time staying as close as possible to central atom C. Molecular shape describes the arrangement of atoms , not the arrangement of domains D. A bonding domain can be a single , double , or triple bond—a double or triple bond counts as one bonding domain III. Polar molecules are asymmetrical A. In polar molecules, positive end
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This note was uploaded on 10/19/2010 for the course CHEM 121 taught by Professor Harris during the Fall '09 term at Community College of Baltimore County.

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Chapter 10 Outline - Chemistry 101 Vandan Desai Chapter 10:...

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