Lecture32 - Standing waves on a string(review L 1 1 2 2L 1 2L 1 L 2 2 2 2 L 3 3 2 L n n 2 v 2L L 2 2L 3 3 2 2 L 1 n n n n=1,2,3 nv nf 1 fn n 2 L

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Standing waves on a string (review) n=1,2,3. .. 1 2 nf L nv v f n n 1 2 1 L L L 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2  L L L 2 2 2 3 2 3 L 3 2 3 L n n L 2 n n L n 1 2 Different boundary conditions: Both ends fixed (see above) Both ends free (similar to both ends fixed ) One end fixed and on end free (next slide) 1 nf f n
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One end fixed and on end free 3 4 3 L 1 4 1 L n n L 4 n n L n 1 4 1 4 nf L nv v f n n n=1 n=3 Standing waves on a string (review) ... 5 , 3 , 1 n
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Standing waves in tubes (longitudinal) Waves in tubes (pipes) can be described in terms of: displacement vibrations of the fluid pressure variations in the fluid A pressure node is a displacement antinode and vice versa Open and both ends closed pipes 1 2 1 L 2 2 2 L 3 2 3 L n=1 n=2 n=3 Closed: displacement pressure Open: pressure displacement n n L 2 ... 3 , 2 , 1 2 n n L n 1 2 nf L vn v f n n
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n=1 n=3 displacement pressure 3 4 3 L 1 4 1 L n n L 4 ... 5 , 3 , 1 4 n n L n n f L vn v f n n 1 4 Example: Standing sound waves are produced in a pipe that is 0.6 m long. For the first overtone, determine the locations along the pipe (measured L 6 . 0 Nodes at 0.0 m and 0.4 m
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This note was uploaded on 10/21/2010 for the course PHYS 221 taught by Professor Herrera-siklody during the Fall '08 term at Iowa State.

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Lecture32 - Standing waves on a string(review L 1 1 2 2L 1 2L 1 L 2 2 2 2 L 3 3 2 L n n 2 v 2L L 2 2L 3 3 2 2 L 1 n n n n=1,2,3 nv nf 1 fn n 2 L

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