The_Civil_Rights_Movement - The Civil Rights Movement The...

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The Civil Rights Movement: The untold narrative of the Civil Rights Movement and how this negatively impacts historians’understanding of the events that occured Nick Dawson History 122Professor Harshman November 10, 2019 In the mid 1900’s, there were many events that occurred which contributed to African
American equality. These events are shared commonly in high school classrooms alike, and theyare centralized around: Jackie Robinson, Brown vs. Board of Education, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., and of course the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Although many of these are told in simple terms, for example Jackie Robinson was some black baseball player who was known as the person who broke the color barrier in baseball or that Brown vs. the Board of Education declared “separate but equal” was unconstitutional. However, focusing on these main points that historians convey is problematic in the sense that we do not obtain a full picture of the events, or the full story. This is problematic because it instead paints a falsified picture of the events that have happened, that none of them had any connection to one another and focuses on more of white America through black victories. It is important to understanding why not receiving this whole story can negatively impact the truth behind the Civil Rights Movements, as ugly as it may be. The first source I will reference is a secondary source from historian Jeniffer Frost’s bookcalled The History Teacher, where she talks about the problem of master narratives associated with The Civil Rights Movement. It is classified as secondary because the book was published in 2012 where she explains her perspective of historical analysis. She describes how chronology is important to the understanding of such events as Brown vs. the Board of Education and MartinLuther King Jr. She claims that the reallocating of some dates “highlights the point that where historians begin and end their histories is a choice, and this fundamentally affects the stories theytell” 1(440). The author places Martin Luther King in the perspective of a “longer chronology and local contexts of African-American activism revealed… Martin didn’t make the movement, the movement made Martin” to explain how the central idea that many are told about Martin is 1Frost, Jennifer. "Using "Master Narratives" to Teach History: The Case of the Civil Rights Movement." The History Teacher45, no. 3 (2012): 437-46. .
false with regard to his impact on the movement (440). She then argues that there are many other factors that were involved with the creation of the Civil Rights Movement other than King himself, and their analysis is necessary for the understanding of how and why historical change occurs.

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