Chapter One Outline - INTRODUCTION: CHAPTER ONE CHAPTER

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
I NTRODUCTION NTRODUCTION : CHAPTER ONE : CHAPTER ONE The first chapters in Unit 1 provide the background for the entire course.  Chapter 1 sets the  stage.  At this point, it is important to establish goals and objectives.  For your students to benefit  from this course, they must understand that (1) the law is a set of general rules, (2) that, in applying  these general rules, a judge cannot always fit a case to suit a rule, so must fit (or find) a rule to suit  the case,  (3)  that, in fitting (or finding) a rule, a judge must also supply reasons for the decision. The tension in the law between the need for stability and the need for change is one of the  first major concepts introduced in this chapter.   The answer to the question, “What is the law?,”  includes how jurists have answered it, how common law courts originated, and the rationale for the  doctrine of  stare decisis . The second major concept in the chapter involves the distinctions among today’s sources of  law and distinctions in its different classifications.  The sources include the federal constitution and  federal laws, state constitutions and statutes (including the UCC), local ordinances, administrative  agency regulations, and case law.  The classifications include substantive and procedural, national  and international, public and private, civil and criminal, and law and equity.   These sources and  categories give students a framework on which to hang the mass of principles known as the law.  When they have learned how to distinguish and categorize the law—which is a skill the study of law  requires—they will have begun to, in the words of John Jay Osborn’s fictional Professor Kingsfield in  The Paper Chase , “think like lawyers.” C HAPTER  O UTLINE I. The Nature of Law Law   consists of enforceable rules governing relationships among individuals and between  individuals and their society.  In the study of jurisprudence, this definition is the point of  departure for legal scholars and philosophers. All legal philosophers agree that logic, ideals, history, and custom influence the development 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 4

Chapter One Outline - INTRODUCTION: CHAPTER ONE CHAPTER

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online