Lesson_Plans_7 - Lesson Plans Introduction to Logic and...

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Unformatted text preview: Lesson Plans Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking © 2010 Mohammed Abouzahr. All rights Reserved. Preface While these lesson plans were not created for public consumption, they will help students follow the lectures in a course deprived of a textbook. These lesson plans are no substitute for the text or the lectures. There are many blanks and open-ended questions left for discussion during lecture. Nevertheless, these lesson plans will be su cient for many students once they are lled out during the lecture. These lesson plans do not contain all of the material that will be covered in the course. Most of the vocabulary needed for the course can be found here, but procedures for assessing validity, constructing proofs, and analyzing fallacies are discussed in the lecture. More speci c information about the lesson plans with respect to speci c portions of the course are as follows. Arguments A notable di erence between the coverage herein and that of other instructors/texts is that abductive arguments are not ignored. Categorical Syllogisms This information concurs with any contemporary portrayal of the subject. LSL Syntax, Semantics, and Deduction These lesson plans serve as a primer for the subject, but these topics are not covered in full detail here. Supplementary texts are necessary. See the course syllabus. Informal Fallacies This information concurs with most contemporary portrayals of the fallacies discussed herein. A list of fallacies (including alternate names) is included under the index entry fallacies of . An index has been included to make it easier for students to look words up. Terms that can be grouped have been. Common alternate names of fallacies are included. A list of fallacies (including common alternate names) is included under the entry fallacies of . Some diagrams have been improved to add clarity. Contents 1 Arguments: Components, Structure, and Evaluation 1 1.1 Types of Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Argument Recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.3 Standard and Diagram forms of Arguments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.4 Types of Arguments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.5 Assessing Arguments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2 Categorical Syllogisms 7 2.1 Categorical Sentences and Their Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.2 Relationships Between Categorical Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.3 Assessing Categorical Syllogisms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3 Sentential Logic: Primer 9 3.1 Assessing Inferential Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.2 Sentential Connectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sentential Connectives ....
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This note was uploaded on 10/19/2010 for the course HFCC 080 taught by Professor Guy during the Spring '10 term at Henry Ford College.

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Lesson_Plans_7 - Lesson Plans Introduction to Logic and...

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