Lecture03Notes

Lecture03Notes - Physics 121. Thursday, January 24, 2008....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Physics 121. Thursday, January 24, 2008. Thor's Emerald Helmet. Credit & Copyright: Robert Gendler Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Physics 121. Thursday, January 24, 2008. Topics: Updated Course Information Review of motion in one dimension Motion in two dimensions: Vectors Position, velocity, and acceleration in two and three dimensions Projectile motion Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Physics 121 Updated course information The Physics 121 workshops will start on Monday January 28. The physics 121 laboratories will start also on Monday January 28. There will be no lecture on Thursday 1/31. I will be in Europe from Wednesday 1/30 until Monday 2/4. Anyone who did not take the Diagnostic Test on Tuesday 1/22 needs to make up this test on Thursday morning 1/31 at 9.40 am in Hoyt (it will take 45 minutes to complete this Diagnostic Test).
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Review of motion in one dimension. Translational motion on one dimension can be described in terms of three parameters: The position x ( t ): units m. The velocity v ( t ): units m/s. The acceleration a ( t ): units m/s 2 . An important special case is the case of constant acceleration (acceleration independent of time) a = dv dt = constant v(t) = v 0 + a t x(t) = x 0 + v 0 t + 1 2 a t 2 Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Review of motion in one dimension. a = dv dt = - g v(t) = v 0 - g t y(t) = y 0 + v 0 t - 1 2 g t 2 Note: in this format, g is assumed to be the magnitude of the gravitational acceleration. Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Motion in two or three dimensions.
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 8

Lecture03Notes - Physics 121. Thursday, January 24, 2008....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online