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Lecture05Notes - Physics 121 February 5 2008 My favorite...

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1 Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Physics 121. February 5, 2008. My favorite airline. Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Physics 121. Tuesday, February 5, 2008. Topics: Course announcements Quiz Newton’s Law of Motion: Force Newton’s First, Second, and Third Law of Motion Problem Solving Strategies Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Physics 121. Course announcements. Homework set # 2 is now available on the web. This set will be due on Saturday morning, February 9, at 8.30 am. Do not wait until the last moment to start working on this set! By start to work on this assignments when it becomes available, you can benefit from the workshops and office hours to get help if you need it. We will try to respond to all course-related emails, but due to the volume of emails, we will not be able to respond instantaneously. Emails send after 5 pm on Fridays are unlikely to be answered before the homework is due.
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2 Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Physics 121. Quiz Lecture 5. The quiz today will have 3 questions. Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Forces. When an object all of a sudden changes its velocity and/or direction, we can always find an interaction between that object and its surroundings that is responsible for this change. We state that the surroundings exert a force on the object studied. Under the influence of a force, an object will accelerate. Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Forces. A force acting on an object will cause the object to accelerate. A force is a vector: It has a magnitude It has a direction The acceleration produced by the force is also a vector: Its magnitude is proportional to the magnitude of the force Its direction is the same as the direction of the force.
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3 Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Understanding motion. In order to understand motion we have to understand the following laws: The force laws : allow us to calculate the force(s) acting on a body from the properties of the body and its environment.
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