Lecture21Notes

Lecture21Notes - Physics 121, April 8, 2008. Harmonic...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Physics 121, April 8, 2008. Harmonic Motion. Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Physics 121. April 8, 2008. Course Information Topics to be discussed today: Simple Harmonic Motion (Review). Simple Harmonic Motion: Example Systems. Damped Harmonic Motion Driven Harmonic Motion Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Physics 121. April 8, 2008. Homework set # 8 is due on Saturday morning, April 12, at 8.30 am. Homework set # 9 will be available on Saturday morning at 8.30 am, and will be due on Saturday morning, April 19, at 8.30 am. Requests for regarding part of Exam # 1 and # 2 need to be given to me by April 17. You need to write down what I should look at and give me your written request and your blue exam booklet(s).
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Harmonic motion (a quick review). Motion that repeats itself at regular intervals. Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Simple Harmonic Motion (a quick review). x(t) = x m cos( ! t + " ) Amplitude Phase Constant Angular Frequency Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Simple Harmonic Motion (a quick review). Other variables frequently used to describe simple harmonic motion: The period T: the time required to complete one oscillation. The period T is equal to 2 π / ω . The frequency of the oscillation is the number of oscillations carried out per second: ν = 1/T The unit of frequency is the Hertz (Hz). Per deFnition, 1 Hz = 1 s -1 .
Background image of page 2
3 Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Simple Harmonic Motion (a quick review). What forces are required? Using Newton’s second law we can determine the force responsible for the harmonic motion: F = ma = - m ω 2 x The total mechanical energy of a system carrying out simple harmonic motion is constant. A good example of a force that produces simple harmonic motion is the spring force: F = - kx . The angular frequency depends on both the spring constant k and the mass m: = ( k / m ) Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM). The torsion pendulum.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/20/2010 for the course PHY PHY 121 taught by Professor Wolfs during the Spring '08 term at Rochester.

Page1 / 10

Lecture21Notes - Physics 121, April 8, 2008. Harmonic...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online