Lecture23Notes

Lecture23Notes - Physics 121, April 15, 2008....

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1 Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Physics 121, April 15, 2008. Temperature/Heat and the Ideal Gas Law. http://www.brickinfo.org/BIA/technotes/t18.htm Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Physics 121. April 15, 2008. Course information Topics to be discussed today: Temperature (review). The universal gas law. Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Physics 121. April 15, 2008. Homework set # 9 is now available and is due on Saturday morning, April 19, at 8.30 am. Midterm Exam # 3 will take place on Tuesday April 22 between 8.00 am and 9.30 am in Hubbell. The material to be covered is the material contained in Chapters 10, 11, 12, and 14. There will be extra ofFce hours on Sunday and Monday. Details will be announced via email.
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2 Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Homework set # 9. All about simple harmonic motion. In all cases: a = - ω 2 x Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Temperature (a quick review). Measuring temperature. In order to measure temperature we must: Agree on a standard reference point to which we assign a certain temperature. Agree on a unit. Agree on a standard thermometer against which all other thermometers can be calibrated. The unit of temperature will be the Kelvin (K). The standard reference point is the triple point of water (T = 273.16 K). http://www.Fuke.fr/common/prod_pages/pages/hart/products/tpw.htm Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Temperature (a quick review). Measuring temperature. The standard thermometer is the constant volume gas thermometer. The bulb of the thermometer, which is ±lled with gas, is put in thermal contact with the system to be studied. The reservoir on the right is now adjusted to change the mercury level so that the gas volume remains unchanged. The temperature of the body is de±ned in terms of the pressure p : T = Cp = C ( p 0 + ρ gh ) h T Reservoir Fixed
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3 Frank L. H. Wolfs Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Temperature (a quick review). Measuring temperature. In general we can thus fnd the temperature oF the body by comparing the measured pressure with the triple-point pressure: T = T 3 ( p / p 3 ) = 273.16 ( p / p 3 ) The method described here depends slightly on the amount and the type oF gas in the bulb. However, this dependence is
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This note was uploaded on 10/20/2010 for the course PHY PHY 121 taught by Professor Wolfs during the Spring '08 term at Rochester.

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Lecture23Notes - Physics 121, April 15, 2008....

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