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Incineration - United States Environmental Protection...

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A Citizen’s Guide to Incineration What is incineration? What is incineration? Incineration is the process of burning hazardous materials to destroy harmful chemicals. Incineration also reduces the amount of material that must be disposed of in a landfill. Although it destroys a range of chemicals, such as PCBs, solvents, and pesticides, incin- eration does not destroy metals. How does it work? How does it work? An incinerator is a type of furnace. It burns material, such as polluted soil, at a controlled temperature, which is high enough to destroy the harmful chemicals. An incinerator can be brought to the site for cleanup or the material can be trucked from the site to an incinerator. The material is placed in the incinerator where it is heated. To increase the amount of harmful chemicals destroyed, workers control the amount of heat and air in the incinerator. As the chemicals heat up, they change into gases, which pass through a flame to be heated ? ? EPA uses many methods to clean up pollution at Superfund and other sites. If you live, work, or go to school near a Superfund site, you may want to learn more about these methods. Perhaps they are being used or are proposed
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  • Spring '10
  • Ulery
  • United States Environmental Protection Agency, Incineration, Harmful chemicals, Air Pollution Control, incinerator, pollution control equipment

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