Vitrification

Vitrification - A Citizen’s Guide to Vitrification What...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: A Citizen’s Guide to Vitrification What is vitrification? What is vitrification? What is vitrification? What is vitrification? What is vitrification? Vitrification is a process that permanently traps harmful chemicals in a solid block of glass- like material. This keeps them from leaving the site. Vitrification can be done either in place or above ground. How does it work? How does it work? How does it work? How does it work? How does it work? Vitrification uses electric power to create the heat needed to melt soil. Four rods, called electrodes, are drilled in the polluted area. An electric current is passed between the electrodes, melting the soil between them. Melting starts near the ground surface and moves down. As the soil melts, the electrodes sink further into the ground causing deeper soil to melt. When the power is turned off, the melted soil cools and vitrifies , which means it turns into a solid block of glass-like material. The electrodes become part of the block. When vitrified, the original volume of soil shrinks. This causes the ground surface in the area to sink slightly. To level it, the sunken area is filled with clean soil....
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 2

Vitrification - A Citizen’s Guide to Vitrification What...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online