Chapter 2

Chapter 2 - Chapter 2- Presidential Leadership After the...

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Chapter 2- Presidential Leadership After the 1968 presidential election, primaries became the preferred method for choosing delgates, and the popular vote became the basis on which convention delegates were to be allocated to the candidates who ran in the primaries and caucuses. In 1968, 11 percent of the voting-age population cast ballots in both parties’ presidential primaries, twenty years later that number exceeded 21 percent. In 2004 that number was at 12 percent (it’s going back down). Although the reforms have moved the parties closer to their goals of greater public involvment and a more demographically representative nominating convention, they have also weakened the power of state party leaders, produced competiting candidates organizations that can rival those of the party, and given powerful interest groups considerable leverage. Front-loading forces candidates to begin their campaigns earlier, which in turn ends the competitive phase of the process sooner and extends the period during
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Chapter 2 - Chapter 2- Presidential Leadership After the...

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