First Amendment

First Amendment - Page 1 Final Paper First...

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Page 1 Final Paper First Amendment-Freedom of Speech First Amendment-Freedom of Speech Shaunee Roseborough POS 321-Constitutional Rights: Civil Liberties and Rights Final Paper Professor Doran October 4, 2010
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Page 2 Final Paper First Amendment-Freedom of Speech “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances” (First amendment-religion & expression, 2010). This statement when looked at seems clear and understandable. After centuries of scrutiny and changes in the way of life, the meaning of this statement has come to be more complex. When one really analyzes the powerfulness of words, speech can be extremely complex. This Amendment was said to be in place to protect the rights of citizen, but does it? Are citizens of this country truly able to express themselves in the way that they see fit or have the First Amendment been so diluted with exceptions and case precedents that the Amendment does not mean what it meant when it was created. In this paper the writer will discuss the history and the origination of the First Amendment-Freedom of Speech right. There are also exceptions to the right and have become a huge portion of the First Amendment Freedom of Speech right; the writer will discuss those exceptions. The writer will also discuss the future of the First Amendment Freedom of Speech right and changes that are expected to be made because of different cases that are presented. The writer will analyze different types of speech and also court cases that ruled on those particular types of speech. The United States Constitution was signed on September 17, 1787, however on this day the First Amendment was not included in the Constitution. It was not until December 15, 1791 that the Bill of Rights were incorporated, this included the first ten amendments of the U.S. Constitution, which was originally twelve. At the time when the First Amendment was incorporated it was designed to protect citizens from the federal government. The individual
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Page 3 Final Paper First Amendment-Freedom of Speech that proposed the idea to incorporate these Bills of Rights into the U.S. Constitution name was James Madison. James Madison was one of the delegates who attended the Constitutional Convention and assisted in the creation of the U.S. Constitution. “Eleven years prior to the creation of the U.S. Constitution James Madison assisted in the development of Virginia’s Constitution and was also referred to James Madison’s Virginia Plan ” (James Madison contribution, 2010). Madison assisted in writing the Federalists Papers, he wrote twenty nine of the eighty six essays of the Federalists Papers. Madison and others did this in an attempt to get the U.S. Constitution approved. After the development of the Federalist Papers New Hampshire became the state that gave enough approval to make the U.S. Constitution the law of the land.
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This note was uploaded on 10/23/2010 for the course CJS 313 taught by Professor Walker during the Spring '10 term at Keuka.

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First Amendment - Page 1 Final Paper First...

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