congo - Devastation of the Congo 1 Devastation of the Congo...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Devastation of the Congo 1 Devastation of the Congo Axia College Devastation of the Congo
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Devastation of the Congo 2 The Democratic Republic of the Congo is found in Africa. The Congo is near Angola, Burundi, and Central African Republic. The Democratic Republic of the Congo is about one quarter the size of the United States, but the Democratic Republic of the Congo is not nearly as developed as the United States. Because the Democratic Republic of the Congo is so close to the equator the temperature tends to be hot and humid. The Congo River, which is the second largest river in Africa runs through the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The population of the Democratic Republic of the Congo is roughly 68,700,000, but Kinshasa (the capitol) has about 7.6 million residents (University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 2009). Almost half of the population of the Democratic Republic of the Congo is under the age of 16. The families that live in this area began having larger families and because of this the population has continued to grow. The growing population has had an adverse effect on the animals and the rain forest as well as the Congo River. Many different animals are found in the Rainforests of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Some of the animals are in danger of becoming endangered species because of poaching or other unnecessary acts that kill the animals. Some of the animals found in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are African buffalo, African bush elephant, African civet, African manatee, African striped weasel, banded mongoose, bili ape, bwindi gorilla, cheetah, lowland gorilla, free-tailed bat, giraffe, hippopotamus, hyena, leopard, lion, mountain gorilla, and rhinoceroses. These animals all rely on each other in some way or another rather it be for protection or for food. The smaller animals rely on some of the larger animals for protection from their predators, and the
Background image of page 2
Devastation of the Congo 3 carnivorous animals rely on the smaller animals for food as well as the animals that naturally die off for food. This cycle not only provides protection and food for the animals, but it also serves as population control for the area so the area does not become overrun with one animal that could throw off the natural balance that all of the different species of animals and plants depend on for their survival (Davis, 2009). Humans are playing a very big part in the devastation currently taking place in
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/24/2010 for the course HIS/115 his/115 taught by Professor Kitchens during the Spring '10 term at Phoenix School of Law.

Page1 / 7

congo - Devastation of the Congo 1 Devastation of the Congo...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online