Commas-Quick-Rules-Purdue

Commas-Quick-Rules-Purdue - Commas: Quick Rules The comma...

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Unformatted text preview: Commas: Quick Rules The comma is a valuable, useful punctuation device because it separates the structural elements of sentences into manageable segments. The rules provided here are those found in traditional handbooks; however, in certain rhetorical contexts and for specific purposes, these rules may be broken. The following is a short guide to get you started using commas. This resource also includes sections with more detailed rules and examples. Quick Guide to Commas 1. Use commas to separate independent clauses when they are joined by any of these seven coordinating conjunctions: and, but, for, or, nor, so, yet. 2. Use commas after introductory a) clauses, b) phrases, or c) words that come before the main clause. 3. Use a pair of commas in the middle of a sentence to set off clauses, phrases, and words that are not essential to the meaning of the sentence. Use one comma before to indicate the beginning of the pause and one at the end to the meaning of the sentence....
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