Lecture 22

Lecture 22 - SIO 40 – Life and Climate on Earth Nov. 23,...

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Unformatted text preview: SIO 40 – Life and Climate on Earth Nov. 23, 2009 Lecture 22 – Vulnerability and adaptation to climate change Lecture summary- Societal vulnerability- Mega deltas- The benefits of adaptation to climate change- Mitigation of carbon emissions- The economics of climate change- Ecosystem vulnerability to climate change- Coral reefs as an example Climate change vulnerability in 2050 he vulnerability of each country or region is related to its adaptive capacity, ie. its ability to respond uccessfully to climate variability and change. This map shows a projection of global vulnerability to limate change in 2050, based on the A2 emissions scenario and assuming current adaptive apacity. Regions especially vulnerable to climate change: The Arctic and the Antarctic Peninsula region, due to high rates of projected warming. Africa, especially the sub-Saharan region, due to low adaptive capacity and projected climate change. Low-lying coasts/deltas and small islands, due to population density, sea level rise, and exposure to storm surge and flooding. Focus - vulnerable coastal deltas River deltas, especially the large mega deltas of Asia, are large, densely populated areas which are extremely vulnerable to climate change as a result of terrestrial (river floods, sediment starvation) and marine (storm surge, erosion, sea level rise) influences. An example of the costs of vulnerability – New Orleans and Katrina hereas an individual hurricane event cannot be attributed to climate change, it can serve to illustrate the onsequences for society if the intensity and/or frequency of such events were to increase in the future. urricane Katrina resulted in the loss of 388 km 2 of coastal wetlands, levees and islands that flank New rleans in the Mississippi River deltaic plain (see above), resulting in loss not only of storm defenses ut also loss of natural habitat. Over 1,800 people lost their lives during Hurricane Katrina and the conomic losses totalled more than US$100 billion. Roughly 300,000 homes and over 1,000 historical and ultural sites were destroyed along the Louisiana and Mississippi coasts How improved adaptation can re-define vulnerability to climate change eyond the coping range of a country or society, the damages and losses due to climate change ecome intolerable, denoting a transition from the coping range to the vulnerable range. Adaptation easures can extend the coping range, and thus raise the threshold for vulnerability. Examples of adaptive measures by sector...
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This note was uploaded on 10/23/2010 for the course SIO SIO 40 taught by Professor Barbeau during the Fall '10 term at UCSD.

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Lecture 22 - SIO 40 – Life and Climate on Earth Nov. 23,...

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