EnvironClimateImpact

EnvironClimateImpact - MIT Joint Program on the Science and...

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Unformatted text preview: MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence from Agricultural Profits and Random Fluctuations of Weather Olivier Deschenes and Michael Greenstone Report No. 131 January 2006 The MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change is an organization for research, independent policy analysis, and public education in global environmental change. It seeks to provide leadership in understanding scientific, economic, and ecological aspects of this difficult issue, and combining them into policy assessments that serve the needs of ongoing national and international discussions. To this end, the Program brings together an interdisciplinary group from two established research centers at MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR). These two centers bridge many key areas of the needed intellectual work, and additional essential areas are covered by other MIT departments, by collaboration with the Ecosystems Center of the Marine Biology Laboratory (MBL) at Woods Hole, and by short- and long-term visitors to the Program. The Program involves sponsorship and active participation by industry, government, and non-profit organizations. To inform processes of policy development and implementation, climate change research needs to focus on improving the prediction of those variables that are most relevant to economic, social, and environmental effects. In turn, the greenhouse gas and atmospheric aerosol assumptions underlying climate analysis need to be related to the economic, technological, and political forces that drive emissions, and to the results of international agreements and mitigation. Further, assessments of possible societal and ecosystem impacts, and analysis of mitigation strategies, need to be based on realistic evaluation of the uncertainties of climate science. This report is one of a series intended to communicate research results and improve public understanding of climate issues, thereby contributing to informed debate about the climate issue, the uncertainties, and the economic and social implications of policy alternatives. Titles in the Report Series to date are listed on the inside back cover. Henry D. Jacoby and Ronald G. Prinn, Program Co-Directors For more information, please contact the Joint Program Office Postal Address : Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change 77 Massachusetts Avenue MIT E40-428 Cambridge MA 02139-4307 (USA) Location : One Amherst Street, Cambridge Building E40, Room 428 Massachusetts Institute of Technology Access : Phone: (617) 253-7492 Fax: (617) 253-9845 E-mail: glo balcha [email protected] t.edu Web site: htt p://MIT.EDU/gl obalch ange/ Printed on recycled paper The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence from Agricultural Profits and Random Fluctuations in Weather Olivier Deschenes † and Michael Greenstone * Abstract This paper measures the economic impact of climate change on agricultural land in the United...
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This note was uploaded on 10/23/2010 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Buddin during the Fall '08 term at UCLA.

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EnvironClimateImpact - MIT Joint Program on the Science and...

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