Physics131_L11WI10

Physics131_L11WI10 - Physics 131 - Mechanics Le cture11 Fe...

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Physics 131 - Mechanics Lecture 11 February 3, 2010 Homeyra Sadaghiani
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October 24, 2010 Physics 131 - Lecture 11 Announcements HW#5 is due at 9 a.m. on Wed, February 10th
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Week Date L# Lecture topic Text reading HW 5 1-Feb 10 Equilibrium, using the 2nd Law 6.1-3 (12 P)   3-Feb 11 2nd Law Application: Friction, Drag   5-Feb 12 Newton’s 3rd Law: Interaction 6   10-Feb 14 Momentum, Impulse & conservation of momentum 9.1-3 (13 P) HW#5   12-Feb F1 Conservation of momentum Tutorial 7 15-Feb H2 Holiday (Presidents' Day)   17-Feb 16 Inelastic collisions 9.4-6 (12 P) HW#6   19-Feb 16 Energy 10.1-4 (13 P) 8 22-Feb 17 Potential energy and elastic collision 10.5-7 (13 P) 24-Feb 18 Work & kinetic energy 11.1-3 (10 P) HW#3 26-Feb E2 EXAM 2- Chapters 5-9 October 24, 2010 Physics 131 - Lecture 11 Lecture Schedule We are here!
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ME-J-SC: Suspended Cart Demonstrates the balance between forces on a cart on an incline which are parallel and perpendicular to the incline plane. 2502 = 1502 + 2002 Procedure: 1. Set the apparatus up as shown, hang weights so that one string runs parallel to the ramp and the other makes a 90° angle with the ramp. 2. Slide the ramp out from under the cart to show that the normal force and the tension force balance the gravitational force on the cart. (Since the ramp is a 3, 4, 5 triangle, and the cart has a mass of 250g; an easy calculation gives the tension force of 150g and a normal force of 200g.) October 24, 2010 Physics 131 - Lecture 11
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ME-J-SC: Suspended Cart Demonstrates the balance between forces on a cart on an incline which are parallel and perpendicular to the incline plane. October 24, 2010 Physics 131 - Lecture 11
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Draw free body diagram Apply Newton's second law Find the tension forces What is the normal force equal to October 24, 2010 Physics 131 - Lecture 11 ME-J-SC: Suspended Cart
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October 24, 2010 Physics 131 - Lecture 11 Friction
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October 24, 2010 Physics 131 - Lecture 11 Static Friction The static friction force has a maximum possible size f s max . Object is at rest as long as f s < f s max . Slips when f s = f s max . f s > f s max is not physically possible. μ is called the coefficient of static
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October 24, 2010 Physics 131 - Lecture 11 Kinetic Friction The kinetic friction force is proportional to the magnitude of the normal force. where the proportionality constant μ is called the
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October 24, 2010 Physics 131 - Lecture 11 Static Friction
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October 24, 2010 Physics 131 - Lecture 11 Kinetic Friction k
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October 24, 2010 Physics 131 - Lecture 11 Coefficients of Friction
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Model for friction October 24, 2010 Physics 131 - Lecture 11 The direction of the frictional force vector f F is perpendicular to the normal force vector N , in the direction opposing relative motion of the two surfaces. Kinetic (sliding): Kinetic (sliding): The magnitude of the frictional force vector is proportional to the magnitude of the normal force N . f F = μ K N It moves, but it heats up the surface it moves on!
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This note was uploaded on 10/24/2010 for the course PHY PHYSICS 13 taught by Professor Mylander during the Spring '09 term at Cal Poly Pomona.

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Physics131_L11WI10 - Physics 131 - Mechanics Le cture11 Fe...

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