Stephen_ORALMOTOR_DROOLING for publish

Stephen_ORALMOTOR_DROOLING for publish - Effectiveness of...

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Effectiveness of oral motor therapy on drooling for children with severe mental handicap 1 Effectiveness of oral motor home program on drooling for children with severe mental handicap. Stephen, TM Chan BSc Occupational therapy; Occupational therapist, Fu Hong Society Hin Dip Centre, Hong Kong Karen, PY Liu BSc, Mphil, PhD, Assistant Professor, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong E-mail: [email protected]
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Effectiveness of oral motor therapy on drooling for children with severe mental handicap 2 Abstract This study was to examine the effectiveness of oral motor home program on drooling for children with severe mental handicap. 18 participants were randomly assigned into Group A (n=9) and Group B (n=9). Group A act as experimental group, with oral motor home program and Group B act as comparison group with once a week oral motor therapy. Baseline assessment phase is followed by a three-month treatment phase, and then the post treatment evaluation. Outcome measures include drooling rate, the drooling severity and frequency perceived by caregivers, oral motor abilities, and also the effect of drooling on learning, daily living and hygiene perceived by caregivers. Group A showed significantly more improvement in the drooling rate (p=0.031), severity of drooling (p=0.003), eight oral motor aspects and impact of drooling on daily living and learning (p=0.13). This study demonstrated importance of home program in oral motor training.
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Effectiveness of oral motor therapy on drooling for children with severe mental handicap 3
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Effectiveness of oral motor therapy on drooling for children with severe mental handicap 4 Drooling, unintentional loss of saliva from the oral cavity, causes physical, functional, psychosocial, and clinical burdens on the persons, their families, and other caregivers. Drooling normally happens during infancy and subsides by 15 to 18 months old as a consequence of oral motor development and will be considered as abnormal if it persists in awaked time after 4 years old (Blasco & Allaire, 1992). Drooling often caused repeated breakdown and infections in peri-oral skin. Clothing and bibs become soiled and needed frequent changing. In addition, teaching materials and communicative devices may become wet and damaged. Dehydration may happen for severe drooling cases (Morris, 1977). It is also unsightly and produces an unpleasant odor, people may avoid individuals who drool and physical contact may be reduced. Social isolation may be the result (Blasco & Allaire, 1992; Thorbecke & Jackson, 1982; Van de Heyning, Marquet, & Creten, 1980). Drooling is mostly caused by poor oral and facial muscle control (Potulska & Friedman, 2005). Children who drool may have increased difficulty forming a bolus (Ekedahl et al., 1974); reduced lip closure; less intraoral suction and more oral residue after the swallow (Lespargot et al., 1993); and decreased ability in sucking, chewing, swallowing, and head, lip, jaw, and tongue control (Van de Heyning et al, 1980). In sensory aspects, facial and oral hyposensitivity could lead to delay in
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This note was uploaded on 10/24/2010 for the course FHSS MSC taught by Professor Drliu during the Winter '08 term at Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

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Stephen_ORALMOTOR_DROOLING for publish - Effectiveness of...

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