Quartus Notes - QUARTUS NOTES by Gregory L. Moss Schematic...

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QUARTUS NOTES by Gregory L. Moss Schematic capture of maxplus2 functions page 2 Drawing signal buses page 3 Sequential circuit simulation page 5 Schematic capture of megafunctions page 6 Simulation of state machines page 10 Measuring time intervals in simulations page 12 Clock frequency divider page 16 1 Copyright © 2009 by Gregory L. Moss
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Schematic capture of maxplus2 functions Many standard IC chips have been designed that contain common types of logic functions such as decoders, encoders, multiplexers, adders, registers, and counters. These have been used for many years to more easily and quickly design more complex logic systems. Quartus II provides an extensive set of pre- designed blocks called Maxplus2 functions that duplicate many of these common logic functions. Maxplus2 functions can be used in design files as easily as gates and flip-flops. Most of these functions are named with the equivalent standard 74-series part number. Functional descriptions and operational information on 74XXX macrofunctions can be obtained from the data sheets for the equivalent standard part devices. Altera has also defined several additional useful functions. The desired function is selected with the Symbol dialog box (click the Symbol Tool button or double-click the left mouse button anywhere in the drawing area). Open the set of folders for libraries , others , and maxplus2 and select the desired function from the list. Click OK. Place and wire all devices in the schematic as you did for gates and flip-flops. 2 Copyright © 2009 by Gregory L. Moss
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Drawing signal buses An individual signal line is called a Node line. Signal lines can be grouped together in buses for convenience. A bus is essentially an array of signal lines that are related to one another. Input signals contained in a bus can be “ripped” (split) out into individual signal lines, and individual output logic signals can be merged into a bus. A wide solid line indicates a bus in a bdf file. To create a bus, toggle the Orthogonal Bus Tool button on and draw using the cursor. If you start drawing a wiring line from a bus, it will automatically be drawn as a bus (wide line). If instead, you start drawing a wiring line from an individual signal, it will automatically be drawn as an individual signal line (narrow line). A drawn line can be changed from a Node line to a Bus line and vice versa by selecting the line and clicking the right mouse button to open the menu. Choose the desired line type from the menu and the highlighted line width will change appropriately. A bus must
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Quartus Notes - QUARTUS NOTES by Gregory L. Moss Schematic...

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