Notes - 9.21.2010

Notes - 9.21.2010 - How do we know that xenopus chordin and...

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How do we know that xenopus chordin and drosophila sog are homologous proteins? BLAST = basic local alignment search tools Are sog and chordin each other’s best BLAST hits, i.e. each other’s closest sequences in the two organisms? Reverse BLAST search and see Probably a fair conclusion that they had a common ancestor that had a protein that looked a lot like chordin and sog Drosophila developmental gene hierarchy: - Maternal genes o Bicoid and nanos - gap genes o Giant and kruppel - pair rule genes o even skipped, fushi tarazi - segment polarity genes o engrailed, wingless turns out that a lot of the segmentation genes are involved in neurological development as well based on the hox gene expression pattern, we can conclude that spiders do in fact grow out of their head (or at least it’s homologous to the head of a common ancestor) how do we get new parts? Things that didn’t exist in common ancestors but exist now example: wings in insects - we know a lot about the genes that define the wings
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Notes - 9.21.2010 - How do we know that xenopus chordin and...

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