ME 497 part 2 - CHAPTER SEVEN Concept Selection Courtesy...

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Unformatted text preview: CHAPTER SEVEN Concept Selection Courtesy ofNovo l'\ordisk Pharmaceuticals, Inc. EXHIBIT 7-1 One of the existing outpatient syringes. 123 124 Chapter 7 A medical supply company retained a product design firm to develop a reusable syringe with precise dosage control for outpatient use. One of the products sold by a competitor is shown in Exhibit 7-1. To focus the development effort, the medical supply company identified two major problems with its current product: cost (the existing model was made of stainless steel) and accuracy of dose metering. The company also requested that the product be tailored to the physical capabilities of the elderly, an important segment of the target market. To summarize the needs of its client and of the intended end users, the team established seven criteria on which the choice of a product concept would be based: o Ease ofhandling. o Ease of use. o Readability of dose settings. o Dose metering accuracy. o Durability. • Ease ofmanufacture. o Portability. The team described the concepts under consideration with the sketches shown in Ex- hibit 7-3. Although each concept nominally satisfied the key customer needs, the team was faced with choosing the best concept for further design, refinement, and production. The need to select one syringe concept from many raises several questions: o How can the team choose the best concept, given that the designs are still quite abstract? • How can a decision be made that is embraced by the whole team? • How can desirable attributes ofotherwise weak concepts be identified and used? • How can the decision-making process be documented? This chapter uses the syringe example to present a concept selection methodology ad- dressing these and other issues. Concept Selection Is an Integral Part of the Product Development Process Early in the development process the product development team identifies a set of cus- tomer needs. By using a variety of methods, the team then generates alternative solution concepts in response to these needs. (See Chapter 4, Identifying Customer Needs, and Chapter 6, Concept Generation, for more detail on these activities.) Concept selection is the process of evaluating concepts with respect to customer needs and other criteria, com- paring the relative strengths and weaknesses of the concepts, and selecting one or more concepts for further investigation, testing, or development. Exhibit 7-2 illustrates how the concept selection activity is related to the other activities that make up the concept development phase of the product development process. Although this chapter focuses on the selection of an overall product concept at the beginning of the development process, the method we present is also useful later in the development process when the team must select subsystem concepts, components, and production processes. Concept Selection 125 EXHIBIT 7·2 Concept selection is part of the overall concept development phase....
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This note was uploaded on 10/24/2010 for the course ME 497 taught by Professor Bush during the Spring '10 term at Catholic Central High School, Lethbridge.

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ME 497 part 2 - CHAPTER SEVEN Concept Selection Courtesy...

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