Oct 27 - Document Discussion - Brown v. Board

Oct 27 - Document Discussion - Brown v. Board - I WESTERN...

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-- i: Under the guise of "separate- but-equal" many African American children learned 4QI . . J£L. in dilapidated, ill-equipped schools. .... " I WESTERN NATIONAL PARKS ASSOCIATION Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site What makes history? Usually, it is an unforgettable moment, a fulcrum upon which other events turn. Most often, recorded history is the story of those who won battles, reached finish lines first, or invented surprising mechanical marvels. Generally, it is what is remembered of heroic human deeds. But there are other histories too- histories filled with suffering and loss, small personal ,) stories that don't make the newspapers, and the accumu- lations of daily actions that eventually build sufficient momentum to redirect the course of human lives. , I i t v. Board Education, the 1954 United States Supreme , I Court decision that legally ended segregation in public if· If schools, was the result of such histories, accumulated week i l ! by week, month by month, decade by decade until \ , what had been the status quo transformed into a bright r new birth of equality. This lawsuit and its outcome owe I" I a great debt to the many men and women who have \h struggled for freedom since their feet first touched the soil of the Americas. The decision reached by the Supreme .~ Court in Brown v. Board of Education forever changed the way Americans view equality. 3 :;;;;N, i ; J ~""' •. ',' ~". "
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~~ I 'B::N'V-:O:~:F:~UaCATION X~ Roberts v. City (~f Boston In 1849 lawyers Robert Morris (above) and Charles Sumner represented S~rah Roberts in a SUit against the City of Boston. Sarah's father had tried to enroll her In the five public schools closer to their home than the segregated Smith School Morns and Sumner challenged the city under an 1845 statute providing recovery of damages for any child unlawfully denied public school instruction. On April 8. 1850. Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Lemuel Shaw ruled that the lawyers had not proven that the Smith School provided an Inferior edu- cation US. Supreme Court Justices cited Roberts I' City of Boston in their decision for Plessy Ferguson. How far back do the stories begin? Do historians pinpoint Reconstruction, when the intent of the Thirteenth Amendment (outlawing slavery) only briefly and incompletely found expression in the war-ravaged South? Or do they look further afield to pre-Civil War conditions when many guessed that violence was inevitable? Or are the first stirrings found in the post-cotton gin days when this revolutionary invention expanded the reach of plantation owners, enabling them to seed more lands and enslave more people. Perhaps the origins of BrM/11I range even further back to the seventeenth century, when the last gasp of the Age of Exploration opened the New World to the imposition of Old World values and set the template for the "peculiar insti- tution" that became Southern plantation life. From the ti.llle when enslaved people first arrived on American shores and for the next three centuries, the people of North America have wrestled with questions of equality.
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Oct 27 - Document Discussion - Brown v. Board - I WESTERN...

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