Eth125_Race and Your Community - Simple as Black and White...

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Simple as Black and White Bonita Martin ETH/125 Cultural Diversity February 7, 2010 Instructor Shanda Jones-Burel
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Growing up African Americans was poor, and Caucasians were rich. I saw Caucasian in authorize positions such as police officers, teacher, and Jersey Cities had our first African American mayor was in 2000. I was narrow minded child; however, I only believed what I saw, and the only rich African Americans I knew of were athlete’s (Michael Jordan, Holyfield, and Tyson.) The only Caucasians that dare roamed the streets of my hood where different then the others I saw as professionals. They were drug addicts, and men who came to buy women. In this paper I would like to shed light on my city in the early 90’s, and how we have grown. Also, how I have grown and I am educated know, and consider myself a professional. Jersey City is divided; The hill, Downtown, The heights, The Square, Westside, and The projects (Duncan, Layfette, Montgomery, and Marin). I lived on the Hill above JFK. This is where everyone looked the same. Everyone was African American, and everyone was struggling to stay above water (finicially). So, as a child I began to believe that African Americans struggled from birth, and it was just part of being African American. African American men stood on the corners, and girls in 7 th th grade had babies. I went to public school #34, and the majority of the kids who attended were African Americans. The majority of the teachers were Caucasians with the exception of three. Mrs. Foster the vice principal, Ms. Robinson a 7 th grade teacher, and Ms. Jordan a 1 st grade teacher. I remember them so vividly. As I got older I started to understand more. Those men that I thought just stood on the street corners did more then just stand. They sold drug to women who had given up on every day life, young men who had given up on their hoop dreams, and children who had given up on their moms who had given up on them. Drug dealers treated everyone 2
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the same. They were mean and cruel, and I still remember the afternoons when they
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Eth125_Race and Your Community - Simple as Black and White...

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