MASTERING PHYSICS PHY 132 HW15-2

MASTERING PHYSICS PHY 132 HW15-2 - HW15.2 Due: 11:10pm on...

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Unformatted text preview: HW15.2 Due: 11:10pm on Monday, October 4, 2010 Note: To understand how points are awarded, read your instructor's Grading Policy . [ Switch to Standard Assignment View] Understanding Bernoulli's Equation Bernoulli's equation is a simple relation that can give useful insight into the balance among fluid pressure, flow speed, and elevation. It applies exclusively to ideal fluids with steady flow, that is, fluids with a constant density and no internal friction forces, whose flow patterns do not change with time. Despite its limitations, however, Bernoulli's equation is an essential tool in understanding the behavior of fluids in many practical applications, from plumbing systems to the flight of airplanes. For a fluid element of density that flows along a streamline, Bernoulli's equation states that , where is the pressure, is the flow speed, is the height, is the acceleration due to gravity, and subscripts 1 and 2 refer to any two points along the streamline. The physical interpretation of Bernoulli's equation becomes clearer if we rearrange the terms of the equation as follows: . The term on the left-hand side represents the total work done on a unit volume of fluid by the pressure forces of the surrounding fluid to move that volume of fluid from point 1 to point 2. The two terms on the right-hand side represent, respectively, the change in potential energy, , and the change in kinetic energy, , of the unit volume during its flow from point 1 to point 2. In other words, Bernoulli's equation states that the work done on a unit volume of fluid by the surrounding fluid is equal to the sum of the change in potential and kinetic energy per unit volume that occurs during the flow. This is nothing more than the statement of conservation of mechanical energy for an ideal fluid flowing along a streamline. Part A Consider the portion of a flow tube shown in the figure. Point 1 and point 2 are at the same height. An ideal fluid enters the flow tube at point 1 and moves steadily toward point 2. If the cross section of the flow tube at point 1 is greater than that at point 2, what can you say about the pressure at point 2? Hint A.1 How to approach the problem [ Print ] Hint not displayed Hint A.2 Apply Bernoulli's equation Hint not displayed Hint A.3 Determine with respect to Hint not displayed ANSWER: The pressure at point 2 is lower than the pressure at point 1. equal to the pressure at point 1. higher than the pressure at point 1. Correct Thus, by combining the continuity equation and Bernoulli's equation, one can characterize the flow of an ideal fluid.When the cross section of the flow tube decreases, the flow speed increases, and therefore the pressure decreases. In other words, if , then and ....
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MASTERING PHYSICS PHY 132 HW15-2 - HW15.2 Due: 11:10pm on...

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