The Origin of Zen

The Origin of Zen - The Origin of Zen According to Zen: In...

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The Origin of Zen According to Zen: In ancient times, at the assembly on Spiritual Mountain, Buddha picked up a flower and showed it to the crowd. Everyone was silent, except for the saint Kashyapa, who broke out in a smile. Buddha said, "I have the treasury of the eye of truth, the ineffable mind of nirvana, the most subtle of teachings on the formlessness of the form of reality. It is not defined in words, but is specially transmitted outside of doctrine. I entrust it to Kashyapa the Elder. --Mumonkan (translation by Thomas Cleary) Appreciate Your Life What is this treasury of the true dharma eye and subtle mind of nirvana that Shakyamuni Buddha transmitted? All the Buddhist teachings deal with this most precious treasure. It is your life. It is my life. All of us have abundant opportunities to experience our life in this way at this very moment. How can we realize the Supreme Way manifesting as our life? For whether we realize it or not, being born and dying, renewing our life thousands of times per second, we are always living this unsurpassable life--just as we are. But how do we realize this? Just be! Just do! Each of us has to take care of this treasury of the true dharma eye and subtle mind of nirvana. We must do it. One day is long enough. One sitting period is long enough. Even one second is long enough. And vice versa. A week, ten years, fifty years, or a hundred years may not be long enough. In order to experience yourself in this way, you do not need to wait for any moment. In fact, do not wait! I encourage you. Please enjoy this wonderful life together. Appreciate the world of just this. There is nothing extra. Genuinely appreciate your life as the most precious treasure and take good care of it. --Taizan Maezumi Roshi Why We Practice Ask yourself: what is my life, my life, really all about? What is it above all that really matters? Just imagine for a moment that you have a fairy godmother--what will you wish for when she offers just one wish? A million dollars? Someone to love who will love you in return? Success in some project? More knowledge or wisdom? When this question is asked sincerely, when one is not easily satisfied with standard answers, clichés, the
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This note was uploaded on 10/25/2010 for the course LSP T04.2001.0 taught by Professor Rzonca during the Fall '09 term at NYU.

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The Origin of Zen - The Origin of Zen According to Zen: In...

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