245_FINAL_EXAM_REVIEW_QUESTIONS

245_FINAL_EXAM_REVIEW_QUESTIONS - 1. How does living on the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 1. How does living on the margins affect choices about housing, transportation,, jobs, and healthcare? How are these interrelated? • When one lives on the margins he realizes that all of these entities are interconnected and one often has to be sacrificed for the other • Living closer to the jobs can cost more money, but cheaper housing also means higher transportation costs • People have a limited amount of money, so they have to choose which entity to invest in o Healthcare, though a good a idea for preventative care and saving money later, is often unaffordable initially, so many choose to go without it o As in the movie shown people have the choice between eating or healthcare • Use examples from Nickeled and Dimed and movie watched in class, Walmart video o Healthcare offered from unions too expensive, unions too expensive to pay into each month • Poor housing conditions can also be attributed to poor health, mixed with poor healthcare can have serious consequences 2. What are the “special costs for the poor” that Ehrenheich describes and how do they impact the ability of the working poor to save and move into the middle class? “But the real question is not how well I did at work but how well I did at life in general, which includes eating and having a place to stay. The fact that these are two separate questions needs to be underscored right away. In the rhetorical buildup to welfare reform, it was uniformly assumed that a job was the ticket out of poverty and that the only thing holding back welfare recipients was their reluctance to get out and get one” (Nickel & Dimed 196). Ehrenheich quickly discovered that even which two jobs she could not do both easily. Rent is often times the deal breaker. For instance when she was in Key West she moved into a trailer park from a little home inorder to be closer to work and get a second job. This downgrade actually cost $200 more per month. Often times the poor must sacrifice one thing for another, like housing for a shorter commute to work. The reason for their suffering is “employers resist wage increases with every trick they can think of and every ounce of strength they can summon” (Nickel & Dimed 203). 3. What are the primary policy tools offered by New Governance theory? What is the difference between privatization and the competition model? What are applied examples of each? For the New Governance Theory, the main players involve the public sector, NGO service providers, private for profit entities, and NGO philanthropic organizations, these entities are involved in an intricate web of relationships where each bring something unique to the table. The primary tools it uses is a network that they create by bringing everyone onto the table. This the main tool they use to facilitate communication about change. These communication and networking have resulted in budgetary savings, reduction in duplicate services, and efficiency gains. The difference between the privatization and competition model is that in a privatized service, there is a clear-cut...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 10/25/2010 for the course PPD 245 taught by Professor Agarwal during the Fall '07 term at USC.

Page1 / 15

245_FINAL_EXAM_REVIEW_QUESTIONS - 1. How does living on the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online