ethics3 (intro to DCT)

ethics3 (intro to DCT) - PHIL 4: Introduction to Ethics Out...

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Unformatted text preview: PHIL 4: Introduction to Ethics Out of t e crooked T mber of humani no s aight t ing was ever made . Immanuel Kan 1 From Last Time We were saying that a complet e moral theory should address three main questions 1. The Metaphysical Question 2. The Epistemological Question 3. The Motivational Question Metaphysical Question What makes right actions right and wrong actions wrong? ( Or virtuous/vicious? ) Some proposals: God Society Emotions Their consequences Reason 2 How can we know what is right and what is wrong? ( Or virtuous/vicious? ) Some proposals Divine revelation Reason Conscience ( feelings ) 3 Epistemological Question Why be moral? What reasons do I have for doing what is right? Some proposals: Fear of divine punishment Self- interest Reason Benevolence 4 Motivational Question Enough Distinctions! Weve clarifed what ethics is, discussed the branches oF ethics, and distinguished various kinds oF questions Now to the business oF actually doing some moral philosophy But wait! IF were going to rationally work through the content oF morality, iF were going to systematize, revise, and extend our moral views through philosophical argument, arent we assuming that moral questions have answers? Arent we assuming that their ar e moral Facts to discover? In a word, Yes. Assumptions? Because of the staggering difficulty and significance of [moral questions] any attempt to provide...answer[s] can seem arrogant, pretentious, or embarrassing. Who could be so foolish, so naive, or so dogmatic, as to think that they had themselves (finally!) arrived at the truth about how to live? Indeed, many of us have learned to pretendor even fooled ourselves into thinking that we believethat there are no correct answers here, that ethics is all simply a matter of opinion. And yet, on reflection, most of us...
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ethics3 (intro to DCT) - PHIL 4: Introduction to Ethics Out...

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