ethics8 (more consequences of CR)

ethics8 (more consequences of CR) - PHIL 4: Introduction to...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: PHIL 4: Introduction to Ethics Out of t e crooked T mber of humani no s aight t ing was ever made . Immanuel Kan 1 Cultural Relativism ( Part III ) Compare The Challenge of Cultural Relativism , James Rachels 4. 2 Non-Relativist And what proportion of a society must approve of a practice to make it morally permissible? Some Consequences of CR ( contd ) 3 If the CR theorist sets the number too high ( 80 % say ) , then the CR theorist may wind up in the odd situation of saying that a certain kind of action is morally permissible when 65 % of the society disapproves. ( Or alternatively, the CR theorist may wind up in the odd situation of saying that a certain kind of action is morally prohibited when 65 % of the society approves ) If the CR theorist sets the number too low ( 51 % say ) , then the CR theorist may wind up with a situation in which the moral status of a particular kind of action Fuctuates with the latest polls: morally permissible last month, morally impermissible this month, and morally permissible again next month Some Consequences of CR ( contd ) 5. 4 Non-Relativist And what exactly counts as a society? Some Consequences of CR ( contd ) 5 Some Consequences of CR ( contd ) In a large and heterogenous nation like the United States, are right and wrong determined by the whole country; or do smaller societies like Harlem, San Francisco, rural Iowa, or the Chicano community in Los Angeles set their own moral standards? But if these are cohesive enough to count as morality generating societies, what about such societies as outlaw bikers, the drug culture, or the underworld? And what, then does the relativist say about conflicts between these group moralities or between them and the morality of the overall society? Since an individual may be in several overlapping societies at the same time, he may well be receiving conflicting moral instructionsall of which...are correct according to the relativist (18). Wi ! iam H. Shaw 6 Weve seen that a central argument for CR is confused Weve seen that CR yields conclusions that seem unacceptable For these reasons and others, most serious moral thinkers have rejected CR....
View Full Document

Page1 / 27

ethics8 (more consequences of CR) - PHIL 4: Introduction to...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online