6 - Chapter 4 - TC 9-524 Chapter 4 DRILLING MACHINES...

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TC 9-524 Chapter 4 DRILLING MACHINES GENERAL INFORMATION PURPOSE This chapter contains basic information pertaining to drilling machines. A drilling machine comes in many shapes and sizes, from small hand-held power drills to bench mounted and finally floor-mounted models. They can perform operations other than drilling, such as countersinking, counterboring, reaming, and tapping large or small holes. Because the drilling machines can perform all of these operations, this chapter will also cover the types of drill bits, took, and shop formulas for setting up each operation. Safety plays a critical part in any operation involving power equipment. This chapter will cover procedures for servicing, maintaining, and setting up the work, proper methods of selecting tools, and work holding devices to get the job done safely without causing damage to the equipment, yourself, or someone nearby. USES A drilling machine, called a drill press, is used to cut holes into or through metal, wood, or other materials (Figure 4-1). Drilling machines use a drilling tool that has cutting edges at its point. This cutting tool is held in the drill press by a chuck or Morse taper and is rotated and fed into the work at variable speeds. Drilling machines may be used to perform other operations. They can perform countersinking, boring, counterboring, spot facing, reaming, and tapping (Figure 4-2). Drill press operators must know how to set up the work, set speed and feed, and provide for coolant to get an acceptable finished product. The size or capacity of the drilling machine is usually determined by the largest piece of stock that can be center-drilled (Figure 4-3). For instance, a 15-inch drilling machine can center-drill a 30-inch-diameter piece of stock. Other ways to determine the size of the drill press are by the largest hole that can be drilled, the distance between the spindle and column, and the vertical distance between the worktable and spindle. 4-1
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TC 9-524 CHARACTERISTICS All drilling machines have the following construction characteristics (Figure 4-4): a spindle. sleeve or quill. column, head, worktable, and base. The spindle holds the drill or cutting tools and revolves in a fixed position in a sleeve. In most drilling machines, the spindle is vertical and the work is supported on a horizontal table. The sleeve or quill assembly does not revolve but may slide in its bearing in a direction parallel to its axis. When the sleeve carrying the spindle with a cutting tool is lowered, the cutting tool is fed into the work: and when it is moved upward, the cutting tool is withdrawn from 4-2 the work. Feed pressure applied to the sleeve by hand or power causes the revolving drill to cut its way into the work a few thousandths of an inch per revolution. The column of most drill presses is circular and built
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This note was uploaded on 10/26/2010 for the course ENGINEERIN MECH221 taught by Professor Wetton during the Spring '10 term at The University of British Columbia.

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6 - Chapter 4 - TC 9-524 Chapter 4 DRILLING MACHINES...

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