Human evolution - Early Modern Homo sapiens A natomically...

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Major Questions in Human Evolution • 1. What caused evolution of upright posture • 2. What is relationship of climate and human evolution • 3. What is correct phylogeny of hominids • 4. What caused evolution of dramatic brain size increase? • 5. What was origin of language and music • 6. How did modern humans disperse around globe? • 7. What is the origin of human races, and what are human races genetically
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Brain size through time
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Australopithecus afarensis Aged between 3.9 and 3.0 million years ago •Apelike face with a low forehead, a bony ridge over the eyes, a flat nose, and no chin •Cranial capacity from 375 to 500 cc –Within chimp range, 1/4 - 1/3 modern humans •Pelvis and leg bones far more closely resemble those of modern man, and leave no doubt that they were bipedal
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Australopithecus afarensis, Laetoli footprints Discovered by Mary Leakey Volcanic tuff dated at almost 3.5 million years Upright, bipedal locomotion of two or three hominids
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Unformatted text preview: Early Modern Homo sapiens A natomically modern humans are classified as Homo sapiens sapiens . Every human today belongs to this variety of Homo sapiens . They first began to appear 120,000-100,000 years ago in association with technologies not unlike those of the early Neandertals. It is now clear that they did not come after the Neandertals but were their contemporaries. C ompared to the Neandertals and other late archaic Homo sapiens , modern humans generally have more delicate skeletons. Their skulls are more rounded and their brow ridges protrude less. They also have relatively high foreheads and pointed chins. Climate Change Killed Neandertals, Study Says What are the alternatives: 1. Homo sapiens killed them 2. Loss of food through extinction of Pleistocene big game 3. Disease? Theories of human evolution 1. CANDELABRA (Separate Evolution) 2. OUT OF AFRICA (Replacement) Archaic Homo sapiens Culture...
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This note was uploaded on 10/26/2010 for the course GS 101 taught by Professor Passer during the Summer '09 term at University of Washington.

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Human evolution - Early Modern Homo sapiens A natomically...

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