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Ch1b2010_week7_c

Ch1b2010_week7_c - Organic Reactions Understanding...

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Organic Reactions: Understanding Reactivity From a first approximation, many organic reactions can be explained in terms of dipoles and charge attraction: • when two molecules with complementary dipoles collide with the required activation energy to overcome general electronic repulsion, a chemical change or reaction follows. an extreme example (from the world of inorganic chemistry): a more subtle example: analysis of the reagents in terms of bond dipoles and electronegativity allows you to predict reactivity (to a certain extent)
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Organic Reactions: Understanding Reactivity Additional examples: a charged species can react with neutral compound two neutral compounds can react
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Curved Arrows: A Formalism to Indicate Electron Flow Organic chemists use curved arrows to represent reaction mechanisms “pushing electrons” using curved arrows: rules to live by a curved arrow indicates the movement of a pair of electrons (NOT ATOMS) the curved arrow originates at an electron pair (a filled orbital)
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