SOCI303_Assignment three.docx - Running Head STRANGER AND...

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Running Head: STRANGER AND DOUBLE CONSCIOUSNESS 1 Stranger and Double Consciousness Jessica Munson American Military University
STRANGER AND DOUBLE CONSCIOUSNESS 2 Stranger and Double Consciousness Georg Simmel and W.E.B. DuBois are two significant sociologists that have studied the concepts of the notion of the stranger and double consciousness within society. Both Simmel’s notion of the stranger and DuBois’ notion of double consciousness have many similarities and differences in the social theories. In addition, Simmel’s thesis on group distance and concept of the outsider within and the veil between the races aid to provide a theoretical framework for social groups within society. Simmel’s notion of the stranger and DuBois notion of double consciousness explain group distance and the concept of the outsider within society and the veil between the races. Simmel’s Notion of the Stranger Georg Simmel was a well-known German philosopher and sociologist within his society. He utilized the scientific method to support his studies within society and is commonly remembered for his thoughts on the notion of the stranger. Simmel identified ideal types within society and identified that the meanings of social interactions and social relationships is the core to understanding sociology (Adams & Sydie, 2002). Georg Simmel’s notion of the stranger incorporates remoteness and nearness in social interactions. The “stranger” is referred to as a “potential wanderer” and “an element of society that did not belong from the beginning” (Morris-Reich, 2019, p. 72). In addition, the stranger was identified as a form of human interaction within society that developed based on unique interactions and objectives within society (Adams & Sydie, 2002). The stranger is one being “near and far at the same time” with similar and different attributes that
STRANGER AND DOUBLE CONSCIOUSNESS 3 incorporate the stranger being near and far at the same time (Adams & Sydie, 2002, p. 216). The individual within society is distanced from specific social groups and interactions but their “stranger” status can be changed when they begin interacting within social groups and social interaction. The stranger is not connected to social groups through ties but rather comes and goes

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